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Watch Out for Web Worms

Our owner, Noel Boyer, recently did an interview with KY3 news over the coming web worms. Below is an excerpt of the article. All rights go to KY3.

Web worms in the sun

Image source: iStockPhoto

“It will not be long before our trees are laced with web worms.

“I’ve already started to see some web worms when I’m out and about, they are starting to show up in the area,” Kelly McGowan, the Field Horticultural Specialist for the University of Missouri Extension, said.

McGowan said closer to fall, the trees will have more webbing on them. Right now, the caterpillars are small.

“Some years we’ve had it where the trees look like ghosts, they’re so laced with web worm webs,” Noel Boyer, the owner of All About Trees, said.

Before the worms form those ghost-like webs, you may see the caterpillars on the tips of tree branches.

“Once these little caterpillars start to feed on the foliage of the plant, they will expand their webbing and take in more foliage,” McGowan said,

Web worms won’t permanently damage your trees, they are just unsightly.

“If you just can’t stand it, they can be sprayed,” Boyer said.

Use an insecticide specially targeted for web worms. Unless your tree needs it, don’t start pruning.

“It’s just not okay to wound trees over an insect pest that’s not doing any damage to the tree,” Boyer said.

You do not want to burn the branch as it will cause more damage to the tree. McGowan says it is easiest to just wipe the worms off of the tree. Use a gardening glove.

“Basically can just wipe it out of the tree, the webs will fall to the ground,” McGowan said.

If that makes you squeamish, Boyer recommends using a stick to break the webs open. The birds will be able to feed on the caterpillars inside.”

To read the full article at Ky3, click the link below.

Source: https://www.ky3.com/2021/08/05/watch-out-these-worms-your-trees/

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Proper Pruning in Late Winter

Proper pruning in late winter leads to strong, lush trees and shrubs in the springtime

Pruning cuts are made slightly beyond the branch collar.

Pruning cuts are made slightly beyond the branch collar. COURTESY OF JOHNSON COUNTY K-STATE RESEARCH & EXTENSION

BY DENNIS PATTON for Kansas City Star (MO), FEBRUARY 12, 2020 03:42 PM

Does pruning strike more fear in your heart than a trip to the doctor? Pruning sounds complicated, but once you understand the basic guidelines, the rest falls into place.

PROPER PRUNING IN LATE WINTER – KNOW WHERE TO MAKE THE CUT

Most people hesitate knowing where to make the cut. Discerning “where” does not mean which specific limb needs to be removed. It means where precisely on the branch the cut is to be made.

Every pruning cut should be made at the point where there is another branch, fork, crotch angle or new bud forming. Making the cut at a growth point reduces the chance of decay and uncontrolled growth. Directing new growth is the goal of pruning, not merely pruning to remove growth.

Pruning to this juncture removes tall overgrown limbs, reduces plant height and thins out the plant. When extreme weather impacts our neighborhoods, pruning will reduce the weight of snow, ice and wind, which can lead to branch failure.

The energy that once supported the removed limb is now channeled into the growth of the remaining limbs. It is important to understand the concept of directional pruning.

The direction of the remaining limb or bud will point to where the growth will head. Attempting to control height? Prune to a side-pointing limb. Need to reduce spread? Prune to an upward pointing limb. Tired of the low-hanging limb hitting you in the face? Find a branch growing upward. See how this works?

Removing a limb back to another branch thins out a tree or shrub for better light penetration and less wind resistance. Not only does this apply to shade trees, but flowering and fruit trees as well. More sunlight penetrating the plant will lead to more flowering and fruit development.

HOW TO MAKE THE CUT

Now that you are confident in knowing where to make the cut, the next step is to do it properly. Pruning is an injury to the plant or tree, wounding the wood. The goal is to quickly heal the wound with a correctly made cut.

Pruning cuts are made slightly beyond the branch collar, where a layer of cambium growth has the ability of rapidly sealing off the cut. The branch collar is the raised, rough growth of bark tissue at the crotch angle. Remember, the cut is always made back to a branch angle.

Try to avoid cutting to the outside of the branch collar as it will leave a slight bump. We want to steer clear of creating a stub, a longer piece of wood sticking out. Stubs do not heal and lead to decay or uncontrolled growth. Cutting too close results in a flush cut, which removes the bark collar, leaving a bigger wound. A larger wound is slower to seal and increases the chance of decay.

Tree pruning is done in late winter before new growth. The lack of foliage reveals problem areas, making it easier to know which limbs to remove. Spring is a time of rapid growth for quick recovery. Now go forth and prune. I have confidence in your abilities.

Dennis Patton is a horticulture agent with Kansas State University Research and Extension. Got a question for him or other university extension experts? Email them to [email protected].

https://www.kansascity.com/living/liv-columns-blogs/kc-gardens/article240239351.html


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Anatomy of a Tree

Leaves

Leaves carry out photosynthesis, making food for the tree and releasing oxygen into the air. And this tells us much about their shapes. For example, the narrow needles of a Douglas fir can expose as much as three acres of chlorophyll surface to the sun.

The lobes, leaflets, and jagged edges of many broad leaves have their uses, too. They help evaporate the water used in food-building, reduce wind resistance and even provide “drip tips” to shed rain that, left standing, could decay the leaf.

Branches and Twigs

Branches and twigs grow out of the tree trunk and serve as support structures for leaves, flowers, and fruit. Branches are the main “limbs” of the tree, whereas the twigs are smaller and come off of the branches. They also transport materials between the trunk and the leaves.

Trunk

The trunk of a tree is made up of five different layers.

Anatomy of a Tree
  1. The outer bark is the tree’s protection from the outside world. Continually renewed from within, it helps keep out moisture in the rain and prevents the tree from losing moisture when the air is dry. It insulates against cold and heat and wards off insect enemies.
  2. The inner bark, or “phloem,” is the pipeline through which food is passed to the rest of the tree. It lives for only a short time then dies and turns to cork to become part of the protective outer bark.
  3. The cambium cell layer is the growing part of the trunk. It annually produces new bark and new wood in response to hormones that pass down through the phloem with food from the leaves. These hormones, called “auxins,” stimulate growth in cells. Auxins are produced by leaf buds at the ends of branches as soon as they start growing in the spring.
  4. Sapwood is the tree’s pipeline for water moving up to the leaves. Sapwood is new wood. As newer rings of sapwood are laid down, inner cells lose their vitality and turn to heartwood.
  5. Heartwood is the central, supporting pillar of the tree. Although dead, it will not decay or lose strength while the outer layers are intact. A composite of hollow, needlelike cellulose fibers bound together by a chemical glue called lignin, it is in many ways as strong as steel. Set vertically, a 1″ x 2″ cross-section that is 12″ long can support twenty tons!

Roots

roots

Contrary to popular belief, tree roots are typically found in the top three feet of the soil. As well, they expand well beyond the dripline, often occupying an area two to four times the size of the tree crown.

A tree’s root system works to absorb water and minerals from the soil, anchor the tree to the ground, and store food reserves for the winter. It is made up of two kinds of roots: large perennial roots and smaller, short-lived feeder roots.

Want to read more of our articles? Click here to read about the benefits of trees!


“Anatomy of a Tree.” Advanced Search-The Tree Guide at Arborday.org, The Arbor Day Foundation, www.arborday.org/trees/TreeGuide/anatomy.cfm.


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Deer Damage

Deer Damage to Trees and Landscape

One of the most frustrating things to deal with this time of year is having a deer snack on your beloved plants! Even if you are the type of person to tolerate deer damage because you love them, beware!  Deer are creatures of habit.  Once they feel safe and find a tasty snack, they will visit regularly.

An increase in deer populations and a decrease in their natural habitat have set up a situation in which your favorite landscapes become alternative food sources for deer.  As winter approaches and food sources become scarce, feeding on leaves, stems, and buds of plants becomes more apparent.  Male deer also cause damage by rubbing their antlers along the trunks of trees, stripping off the bark. Deer should be discouraged immediately.  Trees and shrubs can suffer permanent damage.  Deer damage is usually identified by the torn or jagged appearance of branches

deer damage to tree

There are four ways to discourage deer: Fencing, repellents, predators, and deer-resistant plants. 

Fencing requires you to enclose your entire yard with a fence at least six feet tall. This is not necessarily an aesthetically pleasing option and also not cost effective. In some cases, you can put barrier fencing around these individual plants. While it is still unsightly, protecting a tree while it is young is important. 

Homemade and commercial repellents are common control methods to discourage deer, but their effectiveness varies. Snow and rainfall wash them away, so frequent applications are needed. Also, if food sources are scarce, deer may simply ignore the repellents, despite the taste or odor.

As far as predators go, a  noisy dog is a good deer deterrent.  If you don’t have a dog, you can hang shiny tape from branches, or place inflated balls, and other moving objects in the yard to startle deer with sudden movement.  You’ll have to rotate these frequently, however, or deer will soon realize that they are not in danger from these objects.

 If they are hungry enough and food is scarce enough, deer will eat almost anything.  However, there are a number of plants that deer don’t find particularly palatable.  Using these plants in your landscape is often the most cost-effective, least time-consuming, and most aesthetically pleasing solution.

Below is a list of trees and shrubs not favored by deer.  However, the resistance of any plant species may change due to environmental factors.

Always check to make sure that the plant is not invasive before you plant it! 

TREES

Common Name                                                      Scientific Name

American chestnut                                             Castanea dentata

Bald-cypress                                                     Taxodium distichum

Beech                                                                Fagus spp.

Birch                                                                  Betula spp.

Catalpa                                                              Catalpa spp.

Dawn redwood                                                  Metasequoia glyptostroboides

Giant arborvitae                                               Thuja plicata

Ginkgo                                                              Ginkgo biloba

Ironwood                                                           Ostrya virginiana

Japanese tree lilac                                            Syringa reticulata

Larch                                                                 Larix spp.

Honey-locust                                                    Gleditsia triacanthos

Redbud                                                             Cercis canadensis

Sassafras                                                          Sassafras albidum

Smoketree                                                         Cotinus spp.

Sourwood                                                          Oxydendrum arboreum

Sweetgum                                                         Liquidambar styraciflua

Spruce                                                              Picea spp.

Sycamore                                                         Platanus occidentalis

Tulip tree                                                          Liriodendron tulipifera

 

Shrubs

Common Name                                                       Scientific Name

Boxwood                                                              Buxus spp.

Leatherwood                                                       Dirca palustris

Coralberry/Snowberry                                         Symphoricarpos spp.

       * Poisonous, do not eat!

Forsythia                                                             Forsythia spp.

Japanese kerria                                                  Kerria japonica

Common lilac                                                     Syringa vulgaris

Oregon grape-holly                                            Mahonia aquifolium

Smokebush                                                       Cotinus spp

Spicebush                                                         Lindera benzoin                     

Spirea                                                               Spiraea spp.

Carolina allspice                                              Calycanthus floridus

Witch hazel                                                      Hamamelis spp.

 

Ground Covers

Common Name                                                      Scientific Name

Barren strawberry                                              Waldsteinia fragarioides

Bergenia                                                            Bergenia cordifolia

Bugleweed                                                         Ajuga reptans

Bunchberry                                                       Cornus canadensis

Catmint                                                              Nepeta x faassenii

Epimedium                                                        Epimedium spp.

Ferns                                                                 Numerous species

Hens and chicks                                               Sempervivum spp.

Juniper                                                               Juniperus spp.

Lady’s mantle                                                    Alchemilla mollis

Lamium                                                              Lamium spp.

Lily turf                                                              Liriope spicata

Lungwort                                                           Pulmonaria spp.

Mosses                                                              ————–

Pachysandra                                                      Pachysandra spp.

Potentilla                                                            Potentilla spp

Sedum                                                                Sedum spp.

Snow-in-summer                                                Cerastium tomentosum

Sweet woodruff                                                   Galium odoratum

Vinca                                                                   Vinca minor

Violet                                                                    Viola spp.

Wild ginger                                                           Asarum canadense

Wild strawberry                                                    Fragaria spp

 

Perennial Vines

Common Name                                                      Scientific Name

Akebia                                                                Akebia quinata

Bittersweet                                                         Celastrus scandens

Clematis                                                             Clematis spp.                          

Crimson glory vine                                              Vitis coignetiae

Silver lace vine                                                  Polygonum aubertii

Trumpet creeper                                               Campsis radicans

Virginia creeper                                                Parthenocissus quinquefolia

 

Hardy Bulbs

Common Name                                                      Scientific Name

Autumn crocus                                                  Colchicum autumnalis

Crown imperial                                                  Fritillaria imperialis

Daffodil                                                               Narcissus spp.

Grape hyacinth                                                  Muscari spp.

Glory-of-the-snow                                             Chionodoxa luciliae

Ornamental onion                                              Allium spp.

Siberian scilla                                                   Scilla sibirica

Snowdrops                                                       Galanthus nivalis

Winter aconite                                                  Eranthis hyemalis

 

Annuals and Biennials

Common Name                                                      Scientific Name

Ageratum                                                           Ageratum houstonianum

Alyssum                                                             Lobularia maritima

Candytuft                                                          Iberis sempervirens

Forget-me-not                                                   Myosotis spp.

Four o’clock                                                       Mirabilis jalapa

Foxglove                                                           Digitalis purpurea

Heliotrope                                                         Heliotropium arborescens

Larkspur                                                            Delphinium spp.

Lobelia                                                               Lobelia spp.

Marigold                                                            Tagetes spp.

Mexican sunflower                                          Tithonia rotundifolia

Mimulus                                                             Mimulus spp.

Nasturtium                                                        Tropaeolum majus

Petunia                                                              Petunia spp.

Poppy                                                                Papaver spp.

Salvia                                                                Salvia spp.

Snapdragon                                                      Antirrhinum majus

Stocks                                                               Matthiola spp.

Sunflower                                                         Helianthus annuus

Sweet William                                                  Dianthus spp.

 

Hardy Perennials

Common Name                                                    Scientific Name

Monkshood                                                       Aconitum spp.

Anemone                                                           Anemone spp.

Artemisia                                                           Artemisia spp.

Astilbe                                                                Astilbe spp.

Bee Balm                                                           Monarda spp.

Bergenia                                                             Bergenia cordifolia

Black-eyed Susan                                              Rudbeckia hirta

Butterfly weed                                                   Asclepias tuberosa

Columbine                                                         Aquilegia spp.

Coreopsis                                                          Coreopsis spp.

Cranesbill                                                          Geranium spp.

Fleabane daisy                                                  Erigeron x hybridus

Foam flower                                                      Tiarella cordifolia

Gentian                                                             Gentiana spp.

Geum                                                                Geum spp.

Goldenrod                                                         Solidago spp.

Hellebore                                                           Helleborus nigra

Hens & chicks                                                   Sempervivum spp.

Hibiscus                                                             Hibiscus spp.

Iris                                                                      Iris spp.

Jacob’s ladder                                                   Polemonium caeruleum

Rose campion                                                   Lychnis coronaria

Marsh marigold                                                Caltha palustris

Meadow rue                                                     Thalictrum spp.

Meadowsweet                                                  Filipendula spp.

Peony                                                                Paeonia spp.

Phlox                                                                 Phlox divaricata

Pinks                                                                 Dianthus spp.

Purple coneflower                                             Echinacea purpurea

Rockcress                                                         Arabis caucasica

Russian sage                                                   Perovskia atriplicifolia

Salvia                                                               Salvia spp.

Sedum                                                              Sedum spp.

Shasta daisy                                                     Chrysanthemum

Snakeroot                                                         Eupatorium rugosum

Sneezeweed                                                    Helenium autumnale

Snow-in-summer                                             Cerastium tomentosum

Speedwell                                                        Veronica spp.

Toadflax                                                            Linaria spp.

Valerian                                                            Valeriana officinalis

Violet                                                                 Viola spp.

Yarrow                                                               Achillea spp.

 

 

Herbs

Common Name                                                       Scientific Name

Angelica                                                             Angelica archangelica

Artemisia                                                           Artemisia vulargis

Basil                                                                   Ocimum basilicum

Borage                                                               Borago officinalis

Catmint                                                              Nepeta x faassenii

Chamomile                                                        Matricaria spp.

Chives                                                               Allium schoenoprasum

Comfrey                                                            Symphytum x rubrum

Dill                                                                      Anethum graveolens

Fennel                                                               Foeniculum vulgare

Feverfew                                                           Tanacetum parthenium

Germander                                                      Teucrium chamaedrys

Hyssop                                                              Hyssopus officinalis

Lamb’s ears                                                      Stachys byzantina

Lavender                                                          Lavandula angustifolia

Lemon balm                                                    Melissa officinalis

Mint                                                                  Mentha spp.                                       

Mullein                                                             Verbascum spp.

Oregano                                                           Origanum vulgare

Parsley                                                             Petroselinum spp.

Rosemary                                                        Rosmarinus officinalis

Rue                                                                   Ruta graveolens

Sage                                                                 Salvia officinalis

Savory                                                              Satureja montana

Tansy                                                                Tanacetum coccineum

Thyme                                                              Thymus spp.


Works Cited: 
Plants not favored by deer. (n.d.). Retrieved November 15, 2019, from https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-and-plant-advice/horticulture-care/plants-not-favored-deer.

Click here to view our Certified Arborists in Springfield MO!

Please call the office of All About Trees at (417)863-6214 to schedule an estimate. Business hours are Monday-Friday 8:00 am – 4:00 pm.

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Seasonal needle drop

Seasonal Needle Drop in Trees

We’ve noticed an increase in calls concerning yellowing needles in customer’s evergreens, especially White Pines. However, the “problem” is simply seasonal needle drop in trees. This is a normal and natural process in evergreen trees. Every year, evergreens experience a seasonal needle drop that is a normal part of the plant’s cycle. Older needles on the inside of evergreen trees are shed each fall after they turn yellow, brown, or reddish-tan in color. Sometimes this natural process is very subtle and goes unnoticed because only the innermost needles area affected. The change can be gradual, or, with some species, quite rapid. Seasonal needle drop in trees can cause concern to homeowners who are not familiar with this natural occurrence.

White pines show the most dramatic needle drop change! Their annual loss of needles can be especially alarming, as the number of yellow needles outnumbers the tree’s green growth. This can be very worrying to a tree owner! Typically, white pines will retain needles for three years, but in autumn, 2-or-3-year-old needles will change color and drop, leaving only the current season’s growth still attached.  

So if you are seeing your evergreen trees drop yellow needles, this is part of their natural process. However, if you are seeing widespread decay within your tree, then please call the office to schedule an estimate at the phone number listed below. We will be more than happy to take a look at your trees to ensure their health and wellbeing. 

To learn more specifics on seasonal needle drop, please visit https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-and-plant-advice/horticulture-care/seasonal-needle-drop

 

Click here to view our Certified Arborists in Springfield MO!

Please call the office of All About Trees at (417)863-6214 to schedule an estimate. Business hours are Monday-Friday 8:00 am – 4:00 pm. If we miss your call, please leave us a detailed voicemail message with your name, address, phone number, email, and your tree concerns. 

Source

“Seasonal Needle Drop.” Seasonal Needle Drop | The Morton Arboretum, www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-and-plant-advice/horticulture-care/seasonal-needle-drop#:~:text=Every%20year%2C%20evergreens%20experience%20a,part%20of%20the%20plant’s%20cycle.&text=Many%20evergreen%20needles%2C%20as%20they,with%20some%20species%2C%20quite%20rapid.

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Arborist pruning a tree

Mature Tree Pruning

Mature tree pruning removes dead and dying branches to maintain plant health and safety

All About Trees is a full-service tree care company, and one of our services is the pruning of mature trees. Thinning and raising are two types of tree pruning that should be performed periodically. It works to improve the form and shape of the plant, to eliminate interference with objects and structures, and to compensate for structural weaknesses. Thinning is the removal of live branches to reduce density. Research shows that thinning significantly reduces wind resistance and subsequent storm damage. This leads to healthier trees less prone to breakage, which will lead to a longer-lasting tree.

The pruning of lower branches, known as raising, can be used to increase the amount of light to turfgrass and ground covers beneath the crown of a tree. This will allow homeowners to improve the health of other plants within their yards, and improve tree health. In evergreen trees experiencing fungal issues, a small crown raise can be used to increase the airflow under the tree to reduce fungus. This also allows the tree limbs to be lifted off the ground, making the direct spread of fungus more difficult.

All About Trees arborists are trained to evaluate the condition of your trees and determine the type(s) of pruning required. We aim to balance your goals and those of managing plant health and safety. If you would like an estimate to have your trees pruned, please call the office at 417-863-6214. Our office hours are Monday-Friday, 8:00 am – 4:00 pm. If you miss us, please leave us a detailed voicemail message with your name, address, phone number, email, and tree concerns.

To learn more about the services we offer, please go to our Services page!

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Fun Facts About Trees

  • Dendrochronology is the dating and study of annual rings in trees.
  • General Sherman, a giant sequoia, is the largest tree (by volume) in the world, standing 275 feet (83.8m) tall with 52,000 cubic feet of wood (1,486.6m).
  • Leaves appear green because chlorophyll absorbs red and blue light energy, causing the green energy to bounce off the leaf’s surface.
  • Trees provide food and shelter for wildlife.
  • In one day, one large tree can lift up to 100 gallons of water out of the ground and discharge it into the air. Learn more tree facts.
  • Methuselah, an estimated 4,765-year-old ancient Bristlecone Pine, is one of the oldest living trees in the world.
  • Tree shaded surfaces can be 20–45°F (11–25°C) cooler than surfaces in direct sun, helping homeowners reduce summer cooling costs. Find out more about trees and the environment.
  • Consumers have a 12% higher willingness to pay for goods and services in retail areas that have streetscape greening such as street trees and sidewalk gardens. More on the benefits of urban greening.
  • Trees reduce stormwater runoff by capturing and storing rainfall in the canopy and releasing water into the atmosphere through evapotranspiration.

“Fun Facts About Trees.” TreesAreGood.org, International Society of Arboriculture, 2018, www.treesaregood.org/funfacts/funfacts.


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All About Trees Now Employs Two ISA Board Certified Master Arborists!

The ISA Board Certified Master Arborist credential is the highest level of certification offered by International Society of Arboriculture (ISA). This credential recognizes ISA Certified Arborists who have reached the pinnacle of their profession. In addition to passing an extensive scenario-based exam, candidates must abide by a Code of Ethics, which ensures the quality of work. Fewer than two percent of all ISA Certified Arborists® currently hold this certification, and All About Trees has two! We are very lucky to have two individuals with the Board Certified Master Arborist credential.

This is a remarkable achievement! To view more information on this certification and its requirements, please visit https://www.isa-arbor.com/Portals/0/Assets/PDF/Certification-Applications/cert-Application-BCMA.pdf


ALL ABOUT TREES TWO ISA BOARD CERTIFIED MASTER ARBORISTS!

Certified Arborist Noel in a tree
Noel Boyer
ISA Board Certified Master Arborist®
MW-3904B

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Certified Arborist Will in a tree
Will Branch
ISA Board Certified Master Arborist®
MW-4737B

.

 


Our Certified Arborists

In addition to two Board Certified Master Arborists, All About Trees also has seven ISA Certified Arborists on staff. To view a list of our Certified Arborists, click here!


Contact Us:

If you would like to schedule an estimate, please call the office at 417-863-6214. Our office hours are Monday-Friday, 8:00 am – 4:00 pm. If you miss us, please leave us a detailed voicemail message with your name, address, phone number, email, and tree concerns.

We prefer a call, but if you are unable to do so, please use the contact form below.

    Name *

    Email *

    Phone Number *

    Street Address *

    City, State, Zip Code *

    How can we help you? *

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    Emerald Ash Borers

    Missouri Emerald Ash Borer (EAB)

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) is a serious threat to ash trees in Missouri. This invasive pest will eventually kill unprotected ash trees. Many trees can be saved with the careful use of systemic insecticides. However, not all ash trees should be treated, and for many locations the start of treatments should be delayed.


    1. What is emerald ash borer (EAB)?
    EAB is an exotic, invasive, wood-boring beetle that infests and
    kills ash trees in forests and urban areas.

    2. What does EAB look like?
    The adult beetle is dark metallic green with a bullet shaped body
    that is one-half inch long and one-eighth inch wide. EAB larvae
    (immature stage) are flat, creamy-white grubs with distinct bellshaped
    body segments. Adult beetles are usually seen from midMay
    through July on or near ash trees; larvae are found under the
    bark of ash trees during the remaining months of the year.

    3. Where did EAB come from?
    The native range of EAB is eastern Russia, northern China
    and Korea.

    4. How does EAB spread?
    EAB adults generally fly less than a half mile to mate and lay eggs
    on ash trees, making the natural spread of this pest relatively
    slow. Humans, however, can easily move EAB long distances in
    a short period of time. EAB can hitchhike under the bark of ash
    firewood, ash nursery stock, and ash logs and lumber, emerging
    from these materials to start an infestation in a new area.

    5. When was EAB first discovered in the USA? How did it get there?
    EAB was discovered infesting and killing ash trees in the Detroit,
    Michigan area in 2002, but researchers estimate it may have been
    in that area for ten years prior to the initial detection. EAB was
    likely introduced to the US in ash wood used for packing and crating
    goods imported from China.

    6. Where and when was EAB found in Missouri? How did it get here?
    EAB was detected in Missouri in July of 2008. It was found near
    Lake Wappapello at the US Army Corps of Engineers’ Greenville
    Recreation Area in Wayne County. EAB was likely introduced to
    Missouri by a camper bringing infested ash firewood from another
    state.

    7. Where is EAB now?
    Visit eab.missouri.edu to view a current map of Missouri
    counties.

    8. What is being done about EAB in Missouri?
    Several state and federal agencies are responding to the EAB
    threat. Field surveys are done annually to look for new EAB
    infestations. A statewide quarantine has been put in place
    to help slow the spread of EAB. The quarantine prohibits
    movement of hardwood firewood, ash trees, untreated ash
    material (chips, logs, etc.), and EAB itself from Missouri.
    Information about how to respond to EAB and the risks of
    firewood movement is being publicized to communities,
    industries and the general public. Cost-share funds are
    provided to communities to help them prepare for EAB’s arrival.
    Stingless wasps that parasitize and kill EAB eggs and larvae
    are being released at several locations to establish them as
    biological controls to help reduce EAB populations.

    9. How can I help slow the spread of EAB?
    Don’t move firewood! Inform your friends and neighbors of
    the risks of moving firewood. If EAB hasn’t been found in your
    county, keep an eye out for it on ash trees and report any
    possible sightings to officials. Once EAB is known to be in
    your county, consult the EAB Management Guide for Missouri
    Homeowners for advice on managing this destructive insect on
    your ash trees.

    10. Does EAB have any natural enemies?
    In North America, EAB is frequently eaten by woodpeckers.
    There are also a few species of tiny, stingless wasps that
    parasitize EAB eggs and larvae. These wasps have been
    released in a few locations where EAB has been detected
    to help reduce EAB populations. For more information on
    EAB biological control, visit agriculture.mo.gov/plants/pests/
    emeraldash.php.

    11. Where can I get more information?
    Visit eab.missouri.edu or call the EAB Hotline at 1-866-716-
    9974 for more information related to EAB in Missouri. Other
    websites with valuable information include
    emeraldashborer.info and dontmovefirewood.org.


    Works Cited:

    Extensiondata.missouri.edu. (2018). Emerald Ash Borer FAQ. [online] Available at: https://extensiondata.missouri.edu/Pub/docs/v00001/EABfaq.pdf?_ga=2.45824420.1413572983.1539713852-1962532674.1539713852 [Accessed 16 Oct. 2018].

    Extension2.missouri.edu. (2018). Tree Pests: Emerald Ash Borer. [online] Available at: https://extension2.missouri.edu/v1 [Accessed 16 Oct. 2018].


    Our Certified Arborists

    To view a list of our Certified Arborists, click here!

    Please call the office of All About Trees at (417) 863-6214 or fill out a contact request form to schedule an appointment for an estimate.

    Phone: (417) 863-6214
    Address: 3427 W. Farm Road 146, Springfield, MO 65807
    Email: [email protected]

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    Benefits of Trees

    Benefits of Trees

    Have you ever imagined what the world would be like without trees? The benefits of trees extend beyond their beauty. Trees planted today will offer social, environmental, and economic benefits for years to come.

    Learn more about the benefits of trees.

    Social Benefits

    Social benefits of trees go beyond enjoying their beauty. Humans feel a calming effect from being near trees. The serenity we feel can significantly reduce stress, fatigue, and even decrease recovery time from surgery and illness.

    Communal Benefits

    With proper selection and maintenance, even trees can provide benefits to the community. Trees provide privacy, accentuate views, reduce noise and glare, and even enhance architecture. Natural elements and wildlife are brought to the urban environment which increases the quality of life for residents within the community. As well, fruit trees in public green spaces can have the added benefit of providing fresh fruit to the community.

    Environmental Benefits

    Trees alter the environment we live in by moderating climate, improving air quality, reducing stormwater runoff, and harboring wildlife.

    Examples of the environmental benefits of trees:

    • Trees help moderate temperatures by creating a cooling effect which can counteract the heating effect of pavement and buildings in an urban environment.
    • Compact tree foliage can serve as a windbreak, as well as provide protection from rainfall.
    • Leaves filter the air we breathe by removing dust and other particulates and releasing oxygen.
    • Trees provide shelter for small animals, such as squirrels and birds.

    Economic Benefits

    The economic benefits of trees are both direct and indirect. Property values of landscaped homes are 5 to 20 percent higher than those of non-landscaped homes based on the species, size, condition, and location of the trees included in the landscape. Trees also provide shade which can lower cooling costs for your home and reduce heating costs in the winter by acting as a windbreak.

    An arborist can help you determine the value of trees by providing an appraisal. Documentation on the value of trees in your landscape can assist with determining the property value, as well as, help with insurance claims in the event of a loss.

    Learn more about the value of trees

    Maximizing the Benefits of Trees

    Trees provide numerous benefits but in order to maximize a tree’s benefits routine maintenance is required. Though these benefits begin the moment a tree is planted, they are minimal compared to the benefits of a mature tree. The costs associated with removing a large tree and planting a young tree can outweigh the costs of regular tree maintenance practices such as tree inspection, pruning, and mulching.

    Learn more about mature tree care

     

    International Society of Arboriculture

    www.isa-arbor.com • p. +1 217.355.9411 • [email protected]

    ©International Society of Arboriculture 2009-2018
    Email comments and questions to ISA
    Thursday, January 11, 2018 11:42:30 AM (CST/ISA Headquarters Time)
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    Works Cited: 
    “Benefits of Trees.” Trees Are Good, International Society of Arboriculture, 11 Jan. 2018, 11:45, www.treesaregood.org/treeowner/benefitsoftrees.

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