Tag Archives: Tree Removal Springfield MO

Black Walnut – Springfield, MO

BLACK WALNUT
Juglans nigra

Family

Juglandaceae (walnuts)

Description

A large tree with a straight trunk and rounded, open crown. The nuts, spicy odor, large feather-compound leaves, and chambered pith in the twigs help identify it.

Leaves alternate, compound, 1–2 feet long, with 11–23 leaflets. Leaflets 3–5 inches long, 1–2 inches wide, broadest below the middle, the end leaflet smaller than side ones or absent; margin toothed; upper surface yellow-green; lower surface paler, hairy.

Bark grayish-brown or black, grooves deep, ridges broad with sharp or rounded edges, roughly forming diamond-shaped patterns, chocolate-colored when cut.

Twigs stout, rigid, brown to gray-brown, hairy; end bud about ½ inch long; pith light brown, chambered when cut lengthwise.

Flowers April–May. Male flowers in catkins, female flowers in a short spike on the same tree.

Fruits September–October, usually single or in pairs. A green rounded husk, 1½–2½ inches across, covers the round, hard, bony, dark brown or black nut. The kernel is oily, sweet, and edible.

Similar species: Butternut, or white walnut (Juglans cinerea), is scattered and declining in the eastern two-thirds of Missouri, mostly in low and moist soils. It has rather cylindrical fruits, and the nut inside has 4 lengthwise ribs; leaf scars have the upper edge straight (not notched), bordered by a well-defined velvety ridge. The mild-tasting English (or Persian) walnut is the species J. regia. It is native to Eurasia and when cultivated in Missouri does not escape. The state of California grows nearly all of the US commercial supply of English walnuts. Walnuts are in the same family as hickories and pecans.

Key Identifiers

 

  • Leaves long, alternate, feather-compound
  • Leaflets 11–23, toothed
  • Fruits distinctive
  • Bark grayish, deeply grooved with rather diamond-shaped patterns, ridges broad
  • Twigs stout, with chambered pith
  • Distinctive spicy odor
Size

Height: to 90 feet.

Missouri is the world’s top producer of black walnuts, which are used in baking and confections, and even pickled whole! It would be eaten by more people it getting the nutmeats out of the nut was easier. Walnut is the finest wood in the world. In the past, warm brown hardwood was used lavishly in homes, barns, and fences. Today it’s used for furniture, veneer, and gunstocks.

The nuts are eaten by mice and squirrels. The leaves are eaten by larvae of luna moths, regal moths, and others. The presence of such caterpillars naturally attracts warblers and other insectivorous birds. Walnut trees produce a chemical, juglone, that stunts or kills other plants growing nearby.

Black walnut has been designated as Missouri’s official state tree nut. Most of the state’s large, old walnut trees were felled in previous decades for lumber and other uses, yet the superb wood from this species remains in high demand. Young landowners have been planting walnuts in hopes of harvesting them in future decades. Several serious pests may endanger the health of Missouri’s walnuts; educate yourself about thousand cankers disease (TCD), ambrosia beetles, walnut anthracnose, and other diseases, and never, ever transport firewood.

HABITAT AND CONSERVATION

Black walnut grows throughout Missouri in a variety of soils. It grows best on the deep, well-drained soils of north Missouri and on alluvial (river-deposited) soils in the south. Every farm in the state should grow some walnut trees. In addition to providing quality wood, the walnut’s nutmeats are a major industry in the state. Even the hard shells can be used as an abrasive and to make activated carbon.

It is a common misconception that tree services will pay the customer for removal of black walnut trees, due to their high-quality wood. However, this is not true. We at All About Trees will not pay to remove your black walnut tree.

Black Walnut. (n.d.). Retrieved October 10, 2017, from https://nature.mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/black-walnut


Springfield, MO Tree Alert- Our Certified Arborists

To view a list of our Certified Arborists, click here!

Please call the office of All About Trees at (417) 863-6214 or fill out a contact request form to schedule an appointment for an estimate.

Phone: (417) 863-6214
Address: 3427 W. Farm Road 146, Springfield, MO 65807
Email: [email protected] or [email protected]

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Springfield, MO Tree Alert – Japanese Beetles

 Springfield, MO Tree Alert- Japanese Beetles

Tree species affected: Japanese beetles are known to feed on over 300 plant species. Linden (basswood), elm, crabapple, sycamore (planetree), sassafras, plum, cherry, and bald cypress are commonly damaged, as well as grape and rose.

Concerns: Lacy, skeletonized leaves. Partial or entire defoliation.

Description: Japanese beetles feed on the upper surface of leaves, leaving behind veins. Damage is frequently seen near the top of the tree or plant first. These beetles often feed in groups.

Insecticides are not compatible with trying to maintain a pollinator-friendly yard and should never be used on flowering plants or trees that will attract bees and other pollinators.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the lifecycle of the Japanese beetle?

Japanese beetles spend most of their one-year lifecycle under-ground as a white, c-shaped grub. These grubs feed on grass roots and can damage turf if populations are high. Grubs pupate in late spring and emerge from the ground as adult beetles around mid-June in Missouri. These beetles congregate on host plants, particularly those in full sun. Japanese beetles congregate through a combination of pheromones released by females and floral scents emitted by the damaged host. After mating, each female beetle lays 40-60 eggs in the soil over the course of her 30-45 day lifespan. These eggs hatch into grubs in July and August. Most adult Japanese beetles are gone for the year by mid-August.

Will Japanese beetles kill my trees?

Healthy, established trees can typically tolerate a heavy amount of feeding damage. However, this damage is a source of stress for trees. You can help your trees by watering them 2-3 times per month during dry times to avoid additional stress from drought. A good rule of thumb is ten gallons of water per inch of a tree’s diameter.

Should I use a Japanese beetle trap?

Be cautious when using Japanese beetle traps as they are very effective at bringing beetles in from areas well outside of your yard. Traps don’t catch all the beetles they attract, so nearby plants may be heavily damaged. If you decide to use a trap, place it at least 100 feet away from plants you want to protect. Dispose of trapped beetles frequently by dropping them into a bucket of soapy water.

If I control the Japanese beetle grubs in my lawn, will I have fewer beetles next year?

Controlling Japanese beetle grubs in your lawn won’t significantly reduce the number of beetles you see next year. Japanese beetles are strong fliers and can continue to fly in from neighboring areas over a mile way. Grub control may have more of an impact if you live in a forested area where turf grass is uncommon.

How can I control Japanese beetles?

For light infestations on shrubs and young trees, handpicking is an effective method of control. Beetles are typically sluggish and easy to capture early in the morning. Shake stems and branches with Japanese beetles over a bucket of soapy water.

Several contact insecticides are available for control of Japanese beetle adults (e.g. acephate, carbaryl, cyfluthrin, permethrin); check the label to confirm Japanese beetles and your plant species are listed. These chemicals may need to be reapplied at labeled intervals, especially in hot or rainy weather. Organic products containing azadiractin and spinosad are effective deterrents for a few days. Neem oil may be useful in deterring beetles from feeding if used at the first sign of damage.

Systemic insecticides, such as those containing imidacloprid, can be applied as a soil drench to protect some types of trees from Japanese beetles (follow all label restrictions). However, this product would need to be applied in early June in order to be effective since it can take 4-6 weeks for a tree to translocate the chemical from soil to the leaves.

Due to impacts on pollinators, systemic insecticides should not be applied before or during the bloom period on any plant. In addition, use of many IMIDACLOPRID products (e.g. Bayer Advanced Tree & Shrub Insect Control) is NOT ALLOWED on LINDEN (BASSWOOD), a common host tree of Japanese beetles. Product labels contain new restrictions due to frequent misuse and impacts on pollinators.

Are there any biological controls for Japanese beetles?

No biological controls are currently available for managing adult Japanese beetles. Two products are available for biological control of Japanese beetle grubs in the soil. Neither product is 100% effective.

  • Milky spore (milky disease bacteria) is a long-term control technique that can help reduce grub populations in 2-3 years. Introduce milky spore into several spots in your yard in a grid pattern. Once in the soil, the spores will be present for many years. Milky spore requires specific temperature and moisture conditions to infect grubs, so effectiveness varies.
  • Nematodes of the Heterorhabditis strains will attack grubs. Because soil moisture is critical for nematode survival, it can be difficult to maintain proper conditions for nematodes and avoid overwatering plants. Nematodes need to be applied every year up to three times during the grub stage.

What should I do next year to protect my trees?

Keep an eye out in mid-June for Japanese beetles. Handpick beetles off small or newly planted trees. Preventing early feeding damage can protect trees in the following weeks. If populations are too high to remove by hand, spray an insecticide labeled to control Japanese beetles on your particular tree species. Repeat, if needed, at labeled intervals.

For large established trees, help reduce stress caused by Japanese beetle feeding through good tree care practices: water trees 2-3 times per month during drought conditions, avoid wounding by mowers and weed trimmers, and, if used, keep mulch rings no deeper than 3”.

Do weather conditions impact Japanese beetle populations?

Drought conditions in July and August can lead to the death of many newly hatched grubs. During severe droughts, irrigated areas and some low-lying wet locations may be the only places that grubs survive. Harsh winter conditions can also be a limiting factor in Japanese beetle grub survival. Grubs are killed when soil temperatures reach 15°F or when soils remain near 32°F for two months, (snow cover can significantly insulate soils from frigid air). A cold winter without much snow could greatly reduce the following year’s adult beetle population.

Forest Health Program
Missouri Department of Conservation
To contact your local forester, see the local contact box athttp://mdc.mo.gov

Our Certified Arborists

To view a list of our Certified Arborists, click here!

Please call the office of All About Trees at (417) 863-6214 or fill out a contact request form to schedule an appointment for an estimate.

Phone: (417) 863-6214
Address: 3427 W. Farm Road 146, Springfield, MO 65807
Email: [email protected] or [email protected]

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Oak Wilt

Oak Tree Alert – Watch for oak wilt symptoms now

Oak Tree Alert – Watch for oak wilt symptoms now!

Oak wilt is one of the most destructive diseases of oak trees in Missouri. Symptoms begin to appear in late June and early July. Look for wilting and rapid leaf drop beginning in the upper crown of red oak species like black, northern red, pin, scarlet, and shingle oak. While a single tree may be affected initially, eventually you may see a group of affected trees; perhaps a few died last year and symptoms are present on adjacent trees this year. Oak wilt is easily confused with oak decline, which is very common in Missouri. When oak decline is present, leaves often stay on the tree after turning brown, or the trees may die back over a period of years before death occurs.

Once an oak wilt-infected red oak tree shows symptoms, it cannot be saved. Fortunately, treatments can help protect nearby healthy oaks. Oak wilt confirmation through sample testing can help guide these management decisions. See plantclinic.missouri.edu for more information on sample testing provided by the University of Missouri Plant Diagnostic Clinic.

Learn more about oak wilt:  Oak Wilt Forest Health Alert.

Forest Health Program
Missouri Department of Conservation
To contact your local forester, see the local contact box athttp://mdc.mo.gov

Our Certified Arborists

To view a list of our Certified Arborist, click here!

Please call the office of All About Trees at (417) 863-6214 or fill out a contact request form to schedule an appointment for an estimate.

Phone: (417) 863-6214
Address: 3427 W. Farm Road 146, Springfield, MO 65807
Email: [email protected] or [email protected]

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Selecting the Right Arborist for the Job

Selecting the Right Arborist for the Job

 

Storms may cause limbs or entire trees to fall, often landing on other trees, structures, or cars. The weight of storm-damaged trees is great, and they can be dangerous to remove or trim. An arborist can assist in performing the job in a safe manner, while reducing further risk of damage to property.

What Is a Certified Arborist?

An arborist by definition is an individual who is trained in the art and science of planting, caring for, and maintaining individual trees. ISA arborist certification is a nongovernmental, voluntary process by which individuals can document their base of knowledge. It operates without mandate of law and is an internal, self-regulating device administered by the International Society of Arboriculture. Certification provides a measurable assessment of an individual’s knowledge and competence required to provide proper tree care.

A certification is not a measure of standards of practice. Certification can attest to the tree knowledge of an individual but cannot guarantee or ensure quality performance.

Certified Arborists are individuals who have achieved a level of knowledge in the art and science of tree care through experience and by passing a comprehensive examination developed by some of the nation’s leading experts on tree care. Certified Arborists must also continue their education to maintain their certification. Therefore, they are more likely to be up-to-date on the latest techniques in arboriculture.

How do I hire an Arborist?

• Check for membership in professional organizations such as the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA), the Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA), or the American Society of Consulting Arborists (ASCA). Such membership demonstrates a willingness on the part of the arborist to stay up-to-date on the latest techniques and information.
www.isa-arbor.com
www.treesaregood.org

• Check for ISA arborist certification. ISA Certified Arborists are experienced professionals who have passed an extensive examination covering all aspects of tree care.

• Ask for proof of insurance and then phone the insurance company if you are not satisfied. A reputable arborist carries personal and property damage insurance as well as workers’ compensation insurance.

• Check for necessary permits and licenses. Some governmental agencies require contractors to apply for permits and/or to apply for a license before they are able to work.

• Ask for references to find out where the company has done work similar to what you are requesting. Don’t hesitate to check references or visit other work sites where the company or individual has done tree work.

• Get more than one estimate, unless you know and are comfortable with the arborist. You may have to pay for the estimates, and it will take more time, but it will be worth the investment.

• Don’t always accept the low bid. You should examine the credentials and the written specifications of the firms that submitted bids and determine the best combination of price, work to be done, skill, and professionalism to protect your substantial investment.

• Be wary of individuals who go door-to-door and offer bargains for performing tree work. Most reputable companies are too busy to solicit work in this manner.

• Keep in mind that good arborists will perform only industry accepted practices. For example, practices such as topping a tree, removing an excessive amount of live wood, using climbing spikes on trees that are not being removed, and removing or disfiguring living trees without just cause are improper practices and violate industry standards.

Don’t be afraid to ask questions!

— When will the work be started and completed?
— Who will be responsible for clean-up?
— Is this the total price?
— What are the terms of payment?
— If I would like more to be done, what is your hourly rate?

Be an Informed Consumer

One of the best methods to use in choosing an arborist is to educate yourself about some of the basic principles of tree care. ISA offers several brochures which discuss many of the basic principles of tree care. http://www.treesaregood.com

Our Safety Standards

We are Licensed & Insured for your protection and we can prove it! To obtain a free copy of our proof of insurance, just give us a call at 417-863-6214.

  • Liability
  • Auto
  • Property
  • Workers’ Compensation

The safety of our employees, our customers, and their property is our top priority! We prune according to the American National Standards Institute’s (ANSI) procedures. We also follow OSHA standards for safety.

Often tree pruning must be done by tree climbers, when there is no bucket truck access, or when the tree is too dense to move the bucket around in the interior of the canopy. When pruning a tree by climbing, using the appropriate safety equipment is a must. All About Trees trains all our tree trimmers to climb safely using approved equipment and techniques.

All About Trees trains all crew members in using the most up-to-date methods and equipment for rigging down trees in pieces. Tree rigging is a very specialized skill, and can be an opportunity for disastrous results if adequate knowledge and training has not been given. Often we must remove trees with no room to rig down sections of the tree, so we must use a crane to lift the tree, piece by piece, and set it into an open area to be processed and cleaned up.

 

Our Certified Arborists

To view a list of our Certified Arborist, click here!

Please call the office of All About Trees at (417) 863-6214 or fill out a contact request form to schedule an appointment for an estimate.

Phone: (417) 863-6214
Address: 3427 W. Farm Road 146, Springfield, MO 65807
Email: [email protected] or [email protected]

 


 

 

 

“Why Hire an Arborist?” Trees Are Good. International Society of Arboriculture, 2011. Web. 4 May 2017. <http://www.treesaregood.com/treecare/resources/hire_arborist.pdf>.

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Emergency Tree Care

Storms may cause limbs or entire trees to fall, often landing on other trees, structures, or cars. The weight of storm-damaged trees is great, and they can be dangerous to remove or trim. An arborist can assist in performing the job in a safe manner, while reducing further risk of damage to property.

 

Selecting the Right Arborist for the Job

• Check for membership in professional organizations such as the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA), the Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA), or the American Society of Consulting Arborists (ASCA). Such membership demonstrates a willingness on the part of the arborist to stay up-to-date on the latest techniques and information.
www.isa-arbor.com
www.treesaregood.org

• Check for ISA arborist certification. ISA Certified Arborists are experienced professionals who have passed an extensive examination covering all aspects of tree care.

• Ask for proof of insurance and then phone the insurance company if you are not satisfied. A reputable arborist carries personal and property damage insurance as well as workers’ compensation insurance.

• Check for necessary permits and licenses. Some governmental agencies require contractors to apply for permits and/or to apply for a license before they are able to work.

• Ask for references to find out where the company has done work similar to what you are requesting. Don’t hesitate to check references or visit other work sites where the company or individual has done tree work.

• Get more than one estimate, unless you know and are comfortable with the arborist. You may have to pay for the estimates, and it will take more time, but it will be worth the investment.

• Don’t always accept the low bid. You should examine the credentials and the written specifications of the firms that submitted bids and determine the best combination of price, work to be done, skill, and professionalism to protect your substantial investment.

• Be wary of individuals who go door-to-door and offer bargains for performing tree work. Most reputable companies are too busy to solicit work in this manner.

• Keep in mind that good arborists will perform only industry accepted practices. For example, practices such as topping a tree, removing an excessive amount of live wood, using climbing spikes on trees that are not being removed, and removing or disfiguring living trees without just cause are improper practices and violate industry standards.

• Don’t be afraid to ask questions, such as:

— When will the work be started and completed?
— Who will be responsible for clean-up?
— Is this the total price?
— What are the terms of payment?
— If I would like more to be done, what is your hourly rate?

What Is a Certified Arborist?

An arborist by definition is an individual who is trained in the art and science of planting, caring for, and maintaining individual trees. ISA arborist certification is a nongovernmental, voluntary process by which individuals can document their base of knowledge. It operates without mandate of law and is an internal, self-regulating device administered by the International Society of Arboriculture. Certification provides a measurable assessment of an individual’s knowledge and competence required to provide proper tree care.

Certification is not a measure of standards of practice. Certification can attest to the tree knowledge of an individual but cannot guarantee or ensure quality performance.

Certified Arborists are individuals who have achieved a level of knowledge in the art and science of tree care through experience and by passing a comprehensive examination developed by some of the nation’s leading experts on tree care. Certified Arborists must also continue their education to maintain their certification. Therefore, they are more likely to be up-to-date on the latest techniques in arboriculture.

Be an Informed Consumer

One of the best methods to use in choosing an arborist is to educate yourself about some of the basic principles of tree care. ISA offers several brochures which discuss many of the basic principles of tree care. http://www.treesaregood.com

Our Safety Standards

We are Licensed & Insured for your protection and we can prove it! To obtain a free copy of our proof of insurance, just give us a call at 417-863-6214.

  • Liability
  • Auto
  • Property
  • Workers’ Compensation

The safety of our employees, our customers, and their property is our top priority! We prune according to the American National Standards Institute’s (ANSI) procedures. We also follow OSHA standards for safety.

Often tree pruning must be done by tree climbers, when there is no bucket truck access, or when the tree is too dense to move the bucket around in the interior of the canopy. When pruning a tree by climbing, using the appropriate safety equipment is a must. All About Trees trains all our tree trimmers to climb safely using approved equipment and techniques.

All About Trees trains all crew members in using the most up-to-date methods and equipment for rigging down trees in pieces. Tree rigging is a very specialized skill, and can be an opportunity for disastrous results if adequate knowledge and training has not been given. Often we must remove trees with no room to rig down sections of the tree, so we must use a crane to lift the tree, piece by piece, and set it into an open area to be processed and cleaned up.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Why Hire an Arborist?” Trees Are Good. International Society of Arboriculture, 2011. Web. 4 May 2017. <http://www.treesaregood.com/treecare/resources/hire_arborist.pdf>.

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National Arbor Day is April 28, 2017

Arbor Day is an annual observance that celebrates the role of trees in our lives and promotes tree planting and care. As a formal holiday, it was first observed in 1872, in Nebraska. When J. Sterling Morton founded Arbor Day back in 1872, his idea was simple—set aside a special day for tree planting. And today, that idea is more important than ever.

“Each generation takes the earth as trustees. We ought to bequeath to posterity as many forests and orchards as we have exhausted and consumed.”
– J. Sterling Morton, Founder of Arbor Day

Planting a tree is much more than merely digging a hole. Be sure to select a good planting site, select the right tree and follow planting instructions for the type of tree you are planting.

If you are considering planting a tree be sure to check out the “Tree Owners Manual”. This US Forest Service publication highlights proper tree care from installation to maintenance, with many easily understood images and text. Click Here to download a copy of the Tree Owner’s Manual for the Northeastern and Midwestern United States. For a wider audience, the Tree Owner’s Manual—National Edition.

Tree Statistics

Trees provide many benefits to people and the communities they live in.

The net cooling effect of a young, healthy tree is equivalent to ten room-size air conditioners operating 20 hours a day.
– U.S. Department of Agriculture

Trees can boost the market value of your home by an average of 6 or 7 percent.
– Dr. Lowell Ponte

Landscaping, especially with trees, can increase property values as much as 20 percent.
– Management Information Services/ICMA

One acre of forest absorbs six tons of carbon dioxide and puts out four tons of oxygen. This is enough to meet the annual needs of 18 people.
– U.S. Department of Agriculture

There are about 60–200 million spaces along our city streets where trees could be planted. This translates to the potential to absorb 33 million more tons of CO2 every year and saving $4 billion in energy costs.
– National Wildlife Federation

Trees properly placed around buildings can reduce air conditioning needs by 30 percent and can save 20–50 percent in energy used for heating.
– USDA Forest Service

Healthy, mature trees add an average of 10 percent to a property’s value.
– USDA Forest Service

When Is Arbor Day?

For many years, Arbor Day was celebrated on April 22, J. Sterling Morton’s birthday. Today, National Arbor Day is celebrated on the last Friday in April. All fifty states, Puerto Rico, and some U.S. territories have passed legislation adopting Arbor Day, which is celebrated on a date appropriate for tree planting in their region. Visit arborday.org to learn when Arbor Day is celebrated in your state.

 

For additional information and ideas about stewardship, conservation and trees, consider visiting these sites:


Arbor Day Foundation. Web. 10 Apr. 2017.
“Trees Are Good.” Trees Are Good. Web. 10 Apr. 2017.
“Northeastern Area.” Northeastern Area Publication Details. Web. 10 Apr. 2017.

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Do you have an Elm tree?

Do you have an Elm tree? The Ulmus americana (American elm) requires special care in pruning. Unlike many other tree species, pruning must be done at a very specific time of year. Because open wounds attract the elm bark beetle (the major vector for Dutch elm disease), pruning should never be performed from about mid-April to late-July.

AMERICAN ELM

Ulmus americana

 

Illustration of American elm leaves.
American elm, Ulmus americana.
Paul Nelson
Family

Ulmaceae (elms)

Description

A small to medium-sized (to very large) tree, at maturity with spreading branches forming a broad-spreading, fan-shaped crown.

Leaves alternate, simple, 4–6 inches long, 2–3 inches wide, broadest at or below the middle with coarse, sawtooth edges. Smaller teeth appear along the lower side of the larger teeth. Base is uneven. Upper surface dark green, shiny, mostly smooth to somewhat rough.

Bark gray, in cross-section with alternating brown and white layers, grooves deep, ridges flattened with thin closely pressed scales.

Twigs slender, reddish-brown turning ash gray with age, hairy at first, smooth later.

Flowers February–April, in drooping clusters, red to green, small, petals lacking, the flower stalks originating from the same point.

Fruits March–May, in drooping clusters on long stalks originating from the same point; fruit about ½ inch long, seed surrounded by a thin wing; wing broadest in the middle, notched at the tip, with a fringe of silvery hairs along the edge.

Size

Height: to 70 feet or more, but trees that large are rare today; most are smaller, understory trees.

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All About Trees

Crown Restoration Pruning

 

Restoration is pruning conducted on topped or damaged trees over time. Topping is perhaps the most harmful tree pruning practice known. Yet, despite more than 25 years of literature and seminars explaining its harmful effects, topping remains a common practice.

Topping can lead to unacceptable risk. New sprouts readily grow to replace lost foliage. Sprouts provide the means to restore energy reserves in the living wood inside the tree and to grow a new crown. However, sprouts can become weakly attached and can break if not managed correctly. Restoration pruning helps prevent this by guiding growth and selectively pruning sprouts and branches to produce structurally strong architecture.

Pruning a tree is not the same as “cutting limbs”.  An educated, experienced tree pruner only removes limbs for specific reasons.  Some reasons to prune a tree might include dead limbs, broken limbs, crossing/interfering limbs, or limbs that are encroaching on structures or wires.  Most trees do not need to be “shaped”, or cut to a symmetrical shape.  Tree “topping” is an antiquated practice, that involves tree cutting the canopy back to a small size, and forcing the tree to re-sprout to survive, and is generally a bad idea.   Deciding which limbs to prune off is only half the battle.  It is very important that each limb is pruned at the appropriate place, with the appropriate tool, using the right technique, and at the proper time of year.  An ISA Certified Arborist has been trained in pruning trees the right way, and All About Trees has Certified Arborists on the crews, actually doing the work.

All About Trees is a locally owned, full-service tree care company in Springfield MO serving a 20-mile radius around the Springfield area.  We offer many services, including tree pruning and trimming, tree removal, planting, stump grinding, cabling and bracing, shrub trimming, and consultation.

Our owner, Noel Boyer, is an ISA (International Society of Arboriculture) Board Certified Master Arborist, the highest credential awarded to a tree care specialist. Noel calls himself “the tree hugging owner” of All About Trees because he loves your trees as much as you do.  Noel is also a tree climbing champion, winning the Midwestern Tree Climbing Championship 7 times!

All About Trees is a different kind of tree service.  We prune to ANSI A300 pruning standards, and our crews are run by ISA Certified Arborists.  We spend a lot of time and money on education and training for our crew, so we can stay at the leading edge of today’s standards for caring for your valuable trees.  Our uniformed crews are completely covered by property damage and liability insurance, as well as workers compensation to protect our customers from potential liabilities or litigation.  Our office is staffed by helpful and friendly managers ready to assist in scheduling your estimates and tree work.

 

All About Trees is caring for Springfield’s urban forest, one tree at a time.

www.allabouttrees.com

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Spring Tree Planting Selection and Placement

Spring Tree Planting Selection and Placement

Punxsutawney Phil, predicted six more weeks of winter. However, that hasn’t stopped us from getting excited thinking about Spring Planting! In order to have a happy healthy tree it is best to put plenty of thought into tree selection and placement. Our friends over at Tree are Good provide detailed educational brochures to help tree owners understand best management practices and to promote a greater awareness of the benefits that trees provide in our communities. The following article was taken from their tree selection pamplet. You can find it at: http://treesaregood.org/treecare/resources/TreeSelection.pdf

Tree Selection and Placement

Understand important issues in selecting a tree for planting, such as the tree’s intended function, location, common pests, geographic regions and hardiness zones, and considerations for best placement alternatives.

Tree selection and placement are two of the most important decisions a homeowner makes when landscaping a new home or replacing a tree. Many trees have the potential to outlive those who plant them, so the impact of this decision can last a lifetime. Matching the tree to the site benefits both the tree and the homeowner.

One of the most common tree care questions is: “Which kind of tree should I plant?” Before this question can be answered, a number of factors need to be considered:

• Why is the tree being planted? What functions will it serve?
• Is a small, medium, or large tree best suited for the location and available space? Do overhead or belowground utilities preclude planting a large, growing tree — or any tree at all? What clearance is needed for sidewalks, patios, or driveways?
• What are the soil conditions? Is enough soil available of sufficient quality to support mature tree growth?
• How will necessary maintenance be provided? Will someone water, fertilize, and prune the tree as needed after planting?

Answering these and other questions can help you choose the “right tree for the right place.”

Tree Function

Large, healthy trees increase property values and make outdoor surroundings more pleasant. A deciduous shade tree that loses leaves in fall provides cooling relief from summer’s heat while allowing the winter sun to warm a home. An ornamental tree displays beautiful flowers, leaves, bark, or fruit. Evergreens with dense, persistent foliage can provide a windbreak or a screen for privacy. A tree or shrub that produces fruit can provide food for the owner or wildlife. Street trees decrease the glare from pavement, reduce runoff, filter out pollutants, and add oxygen to the air we breathe. Street trees also improve the overall appearance and quality of life in a city or neighborhood.

Form and Size

A basic principle of modern architecture is “form follows function.” Selecting the right form (shape) to complement the desired function (what you want the tree to do) can significantly reduce maintenance costs and increase the tree’s value in the landscape. In addition, mature tree size determines the level of benefits received. Larger trees typically provide the greatest economic and environmental returns.

Depending on site restrictions, you can choose from hundreds of form and size combinations. A low, spreading tree may be planted under overhead utility lines. A narrow, columnar evergreen may provide a screen between two buildings. Large, vase-shaped trees can create an arbor over a driveway or city street.

Site Conditions

Selecting a tree that will thrive in a given set of site conditions is the key to long-term tree survival and reduced maintenance. Consider the following when selecting a tree:

• soil conditions
• exposure (sun and wind)
• drainage
• space constraints
• hardiness zone
• human activity
• insect and disease susceptibility

Soil Conditions

In dense urban areas and new subdivisions, soil is often disturbed, shallow, compacted, and subject to drought. Most trees will suffer in these conditions without additional care. An arborist can take soil samples from your yard to test for texture, fertility, salinity, and pH (alkalinity or acidity). These tests can be used to determine which trees are suited for your property and may include recommendations for improving poor soil conditions

Exposure

The amount of sunlight available will affect tree and shrub species selection for a particular location. Most woody plants require full sunlight for proper growth and flowering. Some do well in, or even prefer, light shade; however, few species perform well in dense shade. Wind exposure is also a consideration. Wind can dry out soils, damage tree crowns, and uproot newly planted trees. Special maintenance, such as staking or more frequent watering, may be necessary to establish young trees on windy sites

Drainage

Tree roots require oxygen to develop and thrive. Poor drainage limits oxygen availability to the roots and may ultimately kill the tree. If drainage is an issue on your property, ask a local arborist about what can be done to correct the problem.

Hardiness

Hardiness is the plant’s ability to survive in the extreme temperatures of the particular geographic region in which you are planting the tree. Plants can be cold hardy, heat tolerant, or both. Most plant reference books provide a map of hardiness zone ranges. Check with your local garden center for the hardiness information for your region.

Space Constraints

Many different factors can limit the planting space available to the tree: overhead or underground utilities, pavement, buildings, other trees, visibility. The list goes on and on. Make sure there is adequate room for the tree you select to grow to maturity, both above and below ground.

Human Activity

Often an overlooked aspect of tree selection, the reality is that the top five causes of tree death result from things people do. Soil compaction, underwatering, overwatering, vandalism, and the number one cause — planting the wrong tree — account for more tree deaths than all insect- and disease-related tree deaths combined.

Pest Problems

Every plant has its particular pest problems, and the severity varies geographically. These pests may or may not be life threatening to the plant, but selecting trees resistant to pest problems specific to your area is the best choice. Your local ISA Certified Arborist, tree consultant, or extension agent can direct you to information relevant to problem species for your location.

Species Selection

Personal preferences and site constraints play major roles in the selection process. Taking into consideration the factors listed above, you can help ensure the tree you plant grows and functions as desired. Remember, the beautiful, mature specimen trees you see in historic neighborhoods and in landscape photography would never have reached their full potential if planted in improperly matched sites.

 

©2011 (1998, 2004) International Society of Arboriculture. Developed by the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA), a non-profit organization supporting tree care research around the world and dedicated to the care and preservation of shade and ornamental trees. For further information, contact: ISA, P.O. Box 3129, Champaign, IL 61826-3129, USA. E-mail inquiries: [email protected]

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Wood Recycling – Springfield, MO

Wood Recycling in Springfield MO

Wood is one of the most valuable recyclable materials because it can be transformed into a wide variety of secondary products. All About Trees has a 100% recycle policy on our wood waste from tree removal and tree trimming. We are happy to give away our wood chips to people who can use them, if they have a convenient place to dump a truck full of them. Many of our chips are donated and used in the local tree nurseries.

Many tree services dump their wood and brush into a pile and burn it to dispose of it. At All About Trees, our logs and brush from tree pruning and tree removals are hauled to a site where they are ground into mulch or compost.

This practice costs more in transportation and disposal fees, but we feel the satisfaction of knowing that our wood waste will continue to be used in a practical and environmentally friendly way, and will eventually break down into biological matter.

Recently, we started an exciting new way to recycle wood. We cut down a bunch of old Oak trees and used our new mill to turn those Oak logs into something useful. When we got done we left our customers with a large pile of freshly milled Oak lumber.

 

Reuse and Recycle!

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