Tag Archives: tree

FALL COLOR

Predicting the peak of fall color can be difficult. Missouri is blessed with a great variety of trees, shrubs, and vines. Their leaves turn at different times, so Missourians enjoy a fall color season that may last four to six weeks. Sassafras, sumac, and Virginia creeper are some of the earliest to change, beginning in mid-September. By late September, black gum, bittersweet, and dogwood are turning.

The peak of fall color in Missouri is usually around mid-October. This is when maples, ashes, oaks, and hickories are at the height of their fall display. Normally by late October, the colors are fading and the leaves beginning to drop from the trees. Fall color is usually finished by the middle of November.

The progression of color change starts earliest in north Missouri and moves southward across the state. Generally, the color change is predictable, but it can vary from year to year. Much depends on the weather.

WHERE’S THE BEST PLACE?

You can enjoy Missouri’s fall color almost anywhere.

  • For spectacular vistas, choose routes along rivers with views of forested bluffs, and along ridges with sweeping scenes of forested landscapes.
  • On a smaller scale, drive on back roads, hike, or take a float trip under a colorful forest canopy on a clear, blue-sky day. Visit MDC Conservation Areas and Missouri State Parks.
  • Even treeless areas, such as prairies and roadsides, display beautiful shades of gold, purple, olive, and auburn with autumn wildflowers, shrubs, and curing, rustling grasses.
  • If you can’t get out of town, enjoy places with mature trees, such as older neighborhoods, parks, and even cemeteries.

Find events on your route

The Missouri Division of Tourism’s online calendar is packed with events happening all across Missouri this fall. Find those along your preferred routes.


MDC Discover Nature. (2019). Fall Colors. [online] Available at: https://nature.mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/fall-colors [Accessed 26 Sep. 2019].

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Emerald Ash Borers

Emerald Ash Borers : Pest 101

Be on the lookout for emerald ash borers. The emerald ash borer (EAB) is a serious threat to ash trees in Missouri. This invasive pest will eventually kill unprotected ash trees. Many trees can be saved with the careful use of systemic insecticides. However, not all ash trees should be treated, and for many locations the start of treatments should be delayed. This guide will assist you in making decisions about protecting your trees from this invasive pest. Find more information at eab.missouri.edu.

In the Ozarks, we are proud of our trees. But a small insect is putting our beautiful ash trees at risk. The emerald ash borer is an invasive pest that will eventually kill unprotected ash trees. Treating your tree early can help save it.

Here are a few signs to know if emerald ash borers have affected your tree:

  • D-shaped exit holes about 1/8″ wide.
  • Winding, s-shaped tunnels just under the bark.
  • New sprouts on the branches and lower trunk.
  • Increased woodpecker activity on the tree.
  • Sparse leaves and/or branches dying in the upper part of the tree.

To identify when is the best time to treat or cut your ash tree, check out this PDF from the Department of Conservation.

 

 


 

Give us a call if you’d like to be added to our calendar for a yearly maintenance check of your trees!

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All About Trees Plant Health Care Program

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Fun Facts About Trees

  • Dendrochronology is the dating and study of annual rings in trees.
  • General Sherman, a giant sequoia, is the largest tree (by volume) in the world, standing 275 feet (83.8m) tall with 52,000 cubic feet of wood (1,486.6m).
  • Leaves appear green because chlorophyll absorbs red and blue light energy, causing the green energy to bounce off the leaf’s surface.
  • Trees provide food and shelter for wildlife.
  • In one day, one large tree can lift up to 100 gallons of water out of the ground and discharge it into the air. Learn more tree facts.
  • Methuselah, an estimated 4,765-year-old ancient Bristlecone Pine, is one of the oldest living trees in the world.
  • Tree shaded surfaces can be 20–45°F (11–25°C) cooler than surfaces in direct sun, helping homeowners reduce summer cooling costs. Find out more about trees and the environment.
  • Consumers have a 12% higher willingness to pay for goods and services in retail areas that have streetscape greening such as street trees and sidewalk gardens. More on the benefits of urban greening.
  • Trees reduce stormwater runoff by capturing and storing rainfall in the canopy and releasing water into the atmosphere through evapotranspiration.

“Fun Facts About Trees.” TreesAreGood.org, International Society of Arboriculture, 2018, www.treesaregood.org/funfacts/funfacts.


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All About Trees Now Employs Two ISA Board Certified Master Arborists!

The ISA Board Certified Master Arborist credential is the highest level of certification offered by International Society of Arboriculture (ISA). This credential recognizes ISA Certified Arborists who have reached the pinnacle of their profession. In addition to passing an extensive scenario-based exam, candidates must abide by a Code of Ethics, which ensures the quality of work. Fewer than two percent of all ISA Certified Arborists® currently hold this certification, and All About Trees has two! We are very lucky to have two individuals with the Board Certified Master Arborist credential.

This is a remarkable achievement! To view more information on this certification and its requirements, please visit https://www.isa-arbor.com/Portals/0/Assets/PDF/Certification-Applications/cert-Application-BCMA.pdf


ALL ABOUT TREES TWO ISA BOARD CERTIFIED MASTER ARBORISTS!

Certified Arborist Noel in a tree
Noel Boyer
ISA Board Certified Master Arborist®
MW-3904B

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Certified Arborist Will in a tree
Will Branch
ISA Board Certified Master Arborist®
MW-4737B

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Our Certified Arborists

In addition to two Board Certified Master Arborists, All About Trees also has seven ISA Certified Arborists on staff. To view a list of our Certified Arborists, click here!


Contact Us:

If you would like to schedule an estimate, please call the office at 417-863-6214. Our office hours are Monday-Friday, 8:00 am – 4:00 pm. If you miss us, please leave us a detailed voicemail message with your name, address, phone number, email, and tree concerns.

We prefer a call, but if you are unable to do so, please use the contact form below.

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All About Trees

All About Trees Has A New Address!

All About Trees has a new address! Exciting things are happening over here. Thank you for your continued working relationship with us. Our new location is:

All About Trees, LLC
3427 W. Farm Road 146
Springfield, MO 65807

This new location is larger than our previous address. This will allow us to expand our business to better serve Springfield and its surrounding area. We look forward to being able to better treat our urban forest!

Please make a note of this new information in your records. We look forward to continuing to work together in the future. Please note that this location is not open to the public. If you would like to give us a visit for whatever reason, please give our office a call ahead of time.

Thank you,

The All About Trees Office


If you would like to schedule an estimate, please call the office at 417-863-6214. If you miss us, please leave us a detailed voicemail message with your name, address, phone number, email, and tree concerns. We will give you a call back as soon as possible.

We offer a variety of tree-related services. To view a full list of our services, please visit https://allabouttrees.com/tree-services-tree-trimmers-springfield-mo/ 

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