Category Archives: Tree Timmers Springfield MO

Proper Pruning in Late Winter

Proper pruning in late winter leads to strong, lush trees and shrubs in the springtime

Pruning cuts are made slightly beyond the branch collar.

Pruning cuts are made slightly beyond the branch collar. COURTESY OF JOHNSON COUNTY K-STATE RESEARCH & EXTENSION

BY DENNIS PATTON for Kansas City Star (MO), FEBRUARY 12, 2020 03:42 PM

Does pruning strike more fear in your heart than a trip to the doctor? Pruning sounds complicated, but once you understand the basic guidelines, the rest falls into place.

PROPER PRUNING IN LATE WINTER – KNOW WHERE TO MAKE THE CUT

Most people hesitate knowing where to make the cut. Discerning “where” does not mean which specific limb needs to be removed. It means where precisely on the branch the cut is to be made.

Every pruning cut should be made at the point where there is another branch, fork, crotch angle or new bud forming. Making the cut at a growth point reduces the chance of decay and uncontrolled growth. Directing new growth is the goal of pruning, not merely pruning to remove growth.

Pruning to this juncture removes tall overgrown limbs, reduces plant height and thins out the plant. When extreme weather impacts our neighborhoods, pruning will reduce the weight of snow, ice and wind, which can lead to branch failure.

The energy that once supported the removed limb is now channeled into the growth of the remaining limbs. It is important to understand the concept of directional pruning.

The direction of the remaining limb or bud will point to where the growth will head. Attempting to control height? Prune to a side-pointing limb. Need to reduce spread? Prune to an upward pointing limb. Tired of the low-hanging limb hitting you in the face? Find a branch growing upward. See how this works?

Removing a limb back to another branch thins out a tree or shrub for better light penetration and less wind resistance. Not only does this apply to shade trees, but flowering and fruit trees as well. More sunlight penetrating the plant will lead to more flowering and fruit development.

HOW TO MAKE THE CUT

Now that you are confident in knowing where to make the cut, the next step is to do it properly. Pruning is an injury to the plant or tree, wounding the wood. The goal is to quickly heal the wound with a correctly made cut.

Pruning cuts are made slightly beyond the branch collar, where a layer of cambium growth has the ability of rapidly sealing off the cut. The branch collar is the raised, rough growth of bark tissue at the crotch angle. Remember, the cut is always made back to a branch angle.

Try to avoid cutting to the outside of the branch collar as it will leave a slight bump. We want to steer clear of creating a stub, a longer piece of wood sticking out. Stubs do not heal and lead to decay or uncontrolled growth. Cutting too close results in a flush cut, which removes the bark collar, leaving a bigger wound. A larger wound is slower to seal and increases the chance of decay.

Tree pruning is done in late winter before new growth. The lack of foliage reveals problem areas, making it easier to know which limbs to remove. Spring is a time of rapid growth for quick recovery. Now go forth and prune. I have confidence in your abilities.

Dennis Patton is a horticulture agent with Kansas State University Research and Extension. Got a question for him or other university extension experts? Email them to [email protected].

https://www.kansascity.com/living/liv-columns-blogs/kc-gardens/article240239351.html


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Anatomy of a Tree

Leaves

Leaves carry out photosynthesis, making food for the tree and releasing oxygen into the air. And this tells us much about their shapes. For example, the narrow needles of a Douglasfir can expose as much as three acres of chlorophyll surface to the sun.

The lobes, leaflets and jagged edges of many broad leaves have their uses, too. They help evaporate the water used in food-building, reduce wind resistance and even provide “drip tips” to shed rain that, left standing, could decay the leaf.

Branches and Twigs

Branches and twigs grow out of the tree trunk and serve as support structures for leaves, flowers and fruit. They also transport materials between the trunk and the leaves.

Trunk

The trunk of a tree is made up of five different layers.

Anatomy of a Tree
  1. The outer bark is the tree’s protection from the outside world. Continually renewed from within, it helps keep out moisture in the rain and prevents the tree from losing moisture when the air is dry. It insulates against cold and heat and wards off insect enemies.
  2. The inner bark, or “phloem,” is the pipeline through which food is passed to the rest of the tree. It lives for only a short time then dies and turns to cork to become part of the protective outer bark.
  3. The cambium cell layer is the growing part of the trunk. It annually produces new bark and new wood in response to hormones that pass down through the phloem with food from the leaves. These hormones, called “auxins,” stimulate growth in cells. Auxins are produced by leaf buds at the ends of branches as soon as they start growing in the spring.
  4. Sapwood is the tree’s pipeline for water moving up to the leaves. Sapwood is new wood. As newer rings of sapwood are laid down, inner cells lose their vitality and turn to heartwood.
  5. Heartwood is the central, supporting pillar of the tree. Although dead, it will not decay or lose strength while the outer layers are intact. A composite of hollow, needlelike cellulose fibers bound together by a chemical glue called lignin, it is in many ways as strong as steel. Set vertically, a 1″ x 2″ cross section that is 12″ long can support twenty tons!

Roots

roots

Contrary to popular belief, tree roots are typically found in the top three feet of the soil. They also expand well beyond the dripline, often occupying an area two to four times the size of the tree crown.

A tree’s root system works to absorb water and minerals from the soil, anchor the tree to the ground, and store food reserves for the winter. It is made up of two kinds of roots: large perennial roots and smaller, short-lived feeder roots.


“Anatomy of a Tree.” Advanced Search-The Tree Guide at Arborday.org, The Arbor Day Foundation, www.arborday.org/trees/TreeGuide/anatomy.cfm.


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All About Trees Now Employs Two ISA Board Certified Master Arborists!

The ISA Board Certified Master Arborist credential is the highest level of certification offered by International Society of Arboriculture (ISA). This credential recognizes ISA Certified Arborists who have reached the pinnacle of their profession. In addition to passing an extensive scenario-based exam, candidates must abide by a Code of Ethics, which ensures the quality of work. Fewer than two percent of all ISA Certified Arborists® currently hold this certification, and All About Trees has two! We are very lucky to have two individuals with the Board Certified Master Arborist credential.

This is a remarkable achievement! To view more information on this certification and its requirements, please visit https://www.isa-arbor.com/Portals/0/Assets/PDF/Certification-Applications/cert-Application-BCMA.pdf


ALL ABOUT TREES TWO ISA BOARD CERTIFIED MASTER ARBORISTS!

Certified Arborist Noel in a tree
Noel Boyer
ISA Board Certified Master Arborist®
MW-3904B

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Certified Arborist Will in a tree
Will Branch
ISA Board Certified Master Arborist®
MW-4737B

.

 


Our Certified Arborists

In addition to two Board Certified Master Arborists, All About Trees also has seven ISA Certified Arborists on staff. To view a list of our Certified Arborists, click here!


Contact Us:

If you would like to schedule an estimate, please call the office at 417-863-6214. Our office hours are Monday-Friday, 8:00 am – 4:00 pm. If you miss us, please leave us a detailed voicemail message with your name, address, phone number, email, and tree concerns.

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Emerald Ash Borers

Missouri Emerald Ash Borer (EAB)

The emerald ash borer (EAB) is a serious threat to ash trees in Missouri. This invasive pest will eventually kill unprotected ash trees. Many trees can be saved with the careful use of systemic insecticides. However, not all ash trees should be treated, and for many locations the start of treatments should be delayed.


1. What is emerald ash borer (EAB)?
EAB is an exotic, invasive, wood-boring beetle that infests and
kills ash trees in forests and urban areas.

2. What does EAB look like?
The adult beetle is dark metallic green with a bullet shaped body
that is one-half inch long and one-eighth inch wide. EAB larvae
(immature stage) are flat, creamy-white grubs with distinct bellshaped
body segments. Adult beetles are usually seen from midMay
through July on or near ash trees; larvae are found under the
bark of ash trees during the remaining months of the year.

3. Where did EAB come from?
The native range of EAB is eastern Russia, northern China
and Korea.

4. How does EAB spread?
EAB adults generally fly less than a half mile to mate and lay eggs
on ash trees, making the natural spread of this pest relatively
slow. Humans, however, can easily move EAB long distances in
a short period of time. EAB can hitchhike under the bark of ash
firewood, ash nursery stock, and ash logs and lumber, emerging
from these materials to start an infestation in a new area.

5. When was EAB first discovered in the USA? How did it get there?
EAB was discovered infesting and killing ash trees in the Detroit,
Michigan area in 2002, but researchers estimate it may have been
in that area for ten years prior to the initial detection. EAB was
likely introduced to the US in ash wood used for packing and crating
goods imported from China.

6. Where and when was EAB found in Missouri? How did it get here?
EAB was detected in Missouri in July of 2008. It was found near
Lake Wappapello at the US Army Corps of Engineers’ Greenville
Recreation Area in Wayne County. EAB was likely introduced to
Missouri by a camper bringing infested ash firewood from another
state.

7. Where is EAB now?
Visit eab.missouri.edu to view a current map of Missouri
counties.

8. What is being done about EAB in Missouri?
Several state and federal agencies are responding to the EAB
threat. Field surveys are done annually to look for new EAB
infestations. A statewide quarantine has been put in place
to help slow the spread of EAB. The quarantine prohibits
movement of hardwood firewood, ash trees, untreated ash
material (chips, logs, etc.), and EAB itself from Missouri.
Information about how to respond to EAB and the risks of
firewood movement is being publicized to communities,
industries and the general public. Cost-share funds are
provided to communities to help them prepare for EAB’s arrival.
Stingless wasps that parasitize and kill EAB eggs and larvae
are being released at several locations to establish them as
biological controls to help reduce EAB populations.

9. How can I help slow the spread of EAB?
Don’t move firewood! Inform your friends and neighbors of
the risks of moving firewood. If EAB hasn’t been found in your
county, keep an eye out for it on ash trees and report any
possible sightings to officials. Once EAB is known to be in
your county, consult the EAB Management Guide for Missouri
Homeowners for advice on managing this destructive insect on
your ash trees.

10. Does EAB have any natural enemies?
In North America, EAB is frequently eaten by woodpeckers.
There are also a few species of tiny, stingless wasps that
parasitize EAB eggs and larvae. These wasps have been
released in a few locations where EAB has been detected
to help reduce EAB populations. For more information on
EAB biological control, visit agriculture.mo.gov/plants/pests/
emeraldash.php.

11. Where can I get more information?
Visit eab.missouri.edu or call the EAB Hotline at 1-866-716-
9974 for more information related to EAB in Missouri. Other
websites with valuable information include
emeraldashborer.info and dontmovefirewood.org.


Works Cited:

Extensiondata.missouri.edu. (2018). Emerald Ash Borer FAQ. [online] Available at: https://extensiondata.missouri.edu/Pub/docs/v00001/EABfaq.pdf?_ga=2.45824420.1413572983.1539713852-1962532674.1539713852 [Accessed 16 Oct. 2018].

Extension2.missouri.edu. (2018). Tree Pests: Emerald Ash Borer. [online] Available at: https://extension2.missouri.edu/v1 [Accessed 16 Oct. 2018].


Our Certified Arborists

To view a list of our Certified Arborists, click here!

Please call the office of All About Trees at (417) 863-6214 or fill out a contact request form to schedule an appointment for an estimate.

Phone: (417) 863-6214
Address: 3427 W. Farm Road 146, Springfield, MO 65807
Email: [email protected]

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Why Hire an Arborist? Springfield, MO

Arborists specialize in the care of individual trees. They are knowledgeable about the needs of trees, and are trained and equipped to provide proper care. Hiring an arborist is a decision that should not be taken lightly. Proper tree care is an investment that can lead to substantial returns. Well cared-for trees are attractive and can add considerable value to your property. Poorly maintained trees can be a significant liability. Pruning or removing trees, especially large trees, can be dangerous work. Tree work should be done only by those trained and equipped to work safely in trees.

Learn more about why you should hire an arborist.

What is a Certified Arborist?

An arborist by definition is an individual who is trained in the art and science of planting, caring for, and maintaining individual trees. ISA arborist certification is a nongovernmental, voluntary process by which individuals can document their base of knowledge. Certified Arborists are individuals who have achieved a level of knowledge in the art and science of tree care through experience and by passing a comprehensive examination developed by some of the nation’s leading experts on tree care.

Find an Arborist

Services an Arborist can Provide

  • Pruning. An arborist can determine the type of pruning necessary to maintain or improve the health, appearance, and safety of trees.
  • Tree Removal. Although tree removal is a last resort, there are circumstances when it is necessary. An arborist can help decide whether a tree should be removed.
  • Emergency Tree Care. An arborist can assist in performing emergency tree care in a safe manner, while reducing further risk of damage to property.
  • Planting. Some arborists plant trees, and most can recommend species that are appropriate for a particular location.
  • Plant Health Care. Preventive maintenance helps keep trees in good health while reducing any insect, disease, or site problems.
  • Many other services. Consulting services, tree risk assessment, cabling and bracing trees, etc.

Learn more about hiring a Certified Arborist.


Our Certified Arborists

To view a list of our Certified Arborists, click here!

Please call the office of All About Trees at (417) 863-6214 or fill out a contact request form to schedule an appointment for an estimate.

Phone: (417) 863-6214
Address: 3427 W. Farm Road 146, Springfield, MO 65807
Email: [email protected] or [email protected]


 

Home. (n.d.). Retrieved October 5, 2018, from https://www.treesaregood.org/treeowner/whyhireanarborist

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Benefits of Trees

Benefits of Trees

Have you ever imagined what the world would be like without trees? The benefits of trees extend beyond their beauty. Trees planted today will offer social, environmental, and economic benefits for years to come.

Learn more about the benefits of trees.

Social Benefits

Social benefits of trees go beyond enjoying their beauty. Humans feel a calming effect from being near trees. The serenity we feel can significantly reduce stress, fatigue, and even decrease recovery time from surgery and illness. Green spaces can also help lower the level of crime within urban environments

Communal Benefits

With proper selection and maintenance, even trees on private property can provide benefits to the community. Trees provide privacy, accentuate views, reduce noise and glare, and even enhance architecture. Natural elements and wildlife are brought to the urban environment which increases the quality of life for residents within the community.

Environmental Benefits

Trees alter the environment we live in by moderating climate, improving air quality, reducing stormwater runoff, and harboring wildlife.

Examples of the environmental benefits of trees:

  • Trees help moderate temperatures by creating a cooling effect which can counteract the heating effect of pavement and buildings in an urban environment.
  • Compact tree foliage can serve as a windbreak, as well as provide protection from rainfall.
  • Leaves filter the air we breathe by removing dust and other particulates and releasing oxygen.

Economic Benefits

The economic benefits of trees are both direct and indirect. Property values of landscaped homes are 5 to 20 percent higher than those of non-landscaped homes based on the species, size, condition and location of the trees included in the landscape. Trees also provide shade which can lower cooling costs for your home and reduce heating costs in the winter by acting as a windbreak.

An arborist can help you determine the value of trees by providing an appraisal. Documentation on the value of trees in your landscape can assist with determining property value, as well as, help with insurance claims in the event of a loss.

Learn more about the value of trees

Maximizing the Benefits of Trees

Trees provide numerous benefits but in order to maximize a tree’s benefits routine maintenance is required. Though these benefits begin the moment a tree is planted, they are minimal compared to the benefits of a mature tree. The costs associated with removing a large tree and planting a young tree can outweigh the costs of regular tree maintenance practices such as a tree inspection, pruning, and mulching.

Learn more about mature tree care

 

International Society of Arboriculture

www.isa-arbor.com • p. +1 217.355.9411 • [email protected]

©International Society of Arboriculture 2009-2018
Email comments and questions to ISA
Thursday, January 11, 2018 11:42:30 AM (CST/ISA Headquarters Time)
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Works Cited: 
“Benefits of Trees.” Trees Are Good, International Society of Arboriculture, 11 Jan. 2018, 11:45, www.treesaregood.org/treeowner/benefitsoftrees.

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Merry Christmas 2017 Trees - Springfield, Mo

Merry Christmas from All About Trees – Springfield, MO

All About Trees – Springfield, MO – We wanted to take a few moments to wish everyone a Merry Christmas. May you have a wonderful New Year full of family, friends and delicious food. The end of the year brings no greater joy than the opportunity to express to you season’s greetings and good wishes. May your holidays and New Year be filled with joy.

Thank you and Merry Christmas!

 

 

 

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The Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA) – Board of Directors

The Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA) – Board of Directors

There are almost 200,000 people working in the tree care industry in the United States. Hi, this is Noel from All About Trees. Like most other trades, we have our own industry associations. The Tree Care Industry Association has almost 2,500 member companies, and it helps tree care companies meet current standards for safety and quality. I’m proud to announce that I’m the newest member of the board of directors for the association. I am by far the smallest company represented on the board, but I was chosen because of All About Trees reputation nationally, for our quality and company culture. It’s an honor to serve on this board and a chance for me to help other small companies, nationwide, with their dreams of growing their business and keeping their employees safe and happy.

All About Trees is a small business in Springfield Missouri, making waves on a national scale. If you need tree work, I hope you’ll give us a chance to show you how we are different. Look us up at www.allabouttrees.com.

All About Trees is caring for Springfield Urban Forest one tree at a time.

 


 

 

To view a list of our Certified Arborists, click here!

Please call the office of All About Trees at (417) 863-6214 or fill out a contact request form to schedule an appointment for an estimate.

Phone: (417) 863-6214
Address: 3427 W. Farm Road 146, Springfield, MO 65807
Email: [email protected] or [email protected]

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Happy Thanksgiving from All About Trees – Springfield, MO

All About Trees – Springfield, MO – We wanted to take a few moments to wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving. May you have a wonderful day full of family, friends and delicious food. In this season of thanks we have many things to be grateful for and one of them is our wonderful customers.

Thank you for your friendship and Happy Thanksgiving!

 

 

 

 

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7 places to see fall colors in Springfield and the Ozarks

7 places to see fall colors in Springfield and the Ozarks

http://www.news-leader.com/story/entertainment/2017/09/27/7-places-see-fall-colors-springfield-and-ozarks/701450001/

JAMES RIVER

(Photo: News-Leader file photo)

Gregory J. Holman and Wes Johnson, News-Leader Published 6:00 a.m. CT Sept. 27, 2017

It’s leaf-peeping season in the Ozarks.As summer temperatures slide into fall’s chilly breezes, leaves transform from bright green to a range of fall colors: golds, reds, oranges and purples. And some brown. Why brown? Drought is a part of this year’s fall-foliage season. The National Weather Service announced Sept. 14 that much of the Ozarks and the eastern half of the state is undergoing light drought conditions. Drought is already making yellow and brown leaves appear on trees in the Show-Me State right now, a forestry specialist told the Columbia Missourian Tuesday. “The reason we are seeing some yellows now is due to the lack of rainfall these past few weeks,” Hank Stelzer, a forestry extension specialist at Mizzou’s College of Agriculture, told the paper. Typically, mid-October is peak fall color season in Missouri, though predicting exactly when those autumn hues will come to life is “difficult,” according to a Missouri Department of Conservation website. Search “fall color” at nature.mdc.mo.gov for more details, along with a weekly updated guide to how the leaves are doing in each of Missouri’s regions. The latest on southwest Missouri is that leaves are “beginning to turn.”

Despite the drought, the classic reds, oranges and purples are on their way, Missouri Department of Conservation officials said in a separate news release. To appear, those colors just need cool — not freezing — autumn nights. Cool air helps trap natural sugars inside the leaves, forming “building blocks” for the full range of fall colors. Meanwhile, cool air breaks down the leaves’ green pigments. Where to find showy, beautiful trees this year? It’s not hard, but here are 7 tips on where to experience fall in all its glory in Springfield and the Ozarks.

 

  1. Urban leaves: Maple Park Cemetery

Topping the list and so easy to see is Maple Park Cemetery in the heart of Springfield, on Grand Street between Campbell and Jefferson avenues. The cemetery is filled with maple trees, which arguably produce the most vivid colors of any tree in the Ozarks. Maple leaves always contain bright red pigments once the green chlorophyll fades away.

Fun fact: Maple Park Cemetery is accessible by a City Utilities bus. Take the red line.

Fall color at the Springfield Conservation Nature CenterBuy Photo

Fall color at the Springfield Conservation Nature Center Tuesday, October 27, 2009. (Photo: News-Leader file photo)

  1. Riverside leaves: the James River

Hiking trails and paddling trips on the James River offer great ways to get outdoors and experience the fall colors.

Walking trails at the Springfield Conservation Nature Center take wanderers down to the river’s edge. Sycamores, oaks and ash trees will soon turn from green to yellow, orange and gold.

Splash your canoe or kayak at Lake Springfield and follow the James River Water Trail five miles upstream to enjoy trees changing color along the shoreline.

In fact, MDC recommends routes along any river with views of forested bluffs and on float trips under a colorful forest canopy.

The cold, blue waters of Ha Ha Tonka Spring emerge

The cold, blue waters of Ha Ha Tonka Spring emerge from a towering rock bluff. (Photo: File photo)

  1. Laughing water leaves: Ha Ha Tonka State Park

Another beautiful fall hike among the trees, the trails at the 3,751-acre Ha Ha Tonka State Park, an hour and 20 minutes northeast of Springfield, are a great place to see the changing trees and towering karst cliffs up close.

The park and its historic stone castle ruins was voted fourth best state park in the nation by readers of USA TODAY.  Not to be missed: The deep blue Ha Ha Tonka spring that pours 58 million gallons of water a day into a forest stream from the base of a massive vertical stone wall.

A small waterfall trickles into a crystal clear poolBuy Photo

A small waterfall trickles into a crystal clear pool at Cedar Gap Conservation Area. (Photo: Wes Johnson/News-Leader)

  1. Hiking leaves: Cedar Gap Conservation Area

If you’re up for a vigorous walk, Cedar Gap Conservation Area in Wright County is just 30 minutes east of Springfield, south of U.S. 60 highway.

The moderately strenuous hiking trail takes visitors downhill through oaks, pines and dogwood trees to a gurgling clear creek that forms the headwaters of Bryant Creek. The first half is all downhill and takes hikers to a small log cabin that once was a fishing and hunting getaway for the previous landowner.

Visitors are surrounded by tall, steep hills, and one of them is the second-highest prominence in Missouri. Be ready for a workout going back uphill, and wear sturdy boots.

An abundance of tree species will be changing color

 

  1. Kid-friendly leaves: Nathanael Greene/Close Memorial Park

For a much less grueling (and more kid-friendly) fall outing, take a stroll at Nathanael Greene/Close Memorial Park on Springfield’s west side. The walkways are paved! The tops of the park’s trees will soon begin changing color, especially around Lake Drummond.

The geese will want a snack, but visitors are encouraged not to feed them. And for a huge variety of color, walk a short distance to the Springfield-Greene County Botanical Center and the Mizumoto Japanese Stroll Garden, which features hundreds of species of trees and plants. All areas are free.

Henning Conservation Area offers more than five milesBuy Photo

Henning Conservation Area offers more than five miles of scenic hiking trails on the northwest edge of Branson. (Photo: Wes Johnson/News-Leader)

  1. Taney County leaves: Branson tours

The Branson/Lakes Area Convention and Visitors Bureau suggests four fall color routes you can drive. They’ll take one hour up to four hours, and leaf-peepers can see Table Rock Lake, Kimberling City, downtown Branson, Forsyth, Rockaway Beach, Bull Shoals Lake, Peel Ferry and Mark Twain National Forest, depending on the route you choose. Oh, and there’s a tour for walkers and joggers through Branson Landing and downtown. Find all the details, including handy maps, at explorebranson.com/fall/driving-tours.

Meanwhile, don’t forget the Henning Conservation Area, located on Highway 76 near Shepherd of the Hills Expressway. It contains five miles of scenic trails.

Leaves of a sweet gum tree glow red and orange Friday,

Leaves of a sweet gum tree glow red and orange Friday, Nov. 4, 2005, at Pinnacle State Park near Little Rock, Ark. (Photo: DANNY JOHNSTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS)

  1. Arkansas leaves: Tour the Natural State

If you really want to road-trip it, head south of the state line. Arkansas Parks and Tourism has a guide to scenic drives throughout the state and beyond. Explore the Boston Mountains Scenic Loop — from Fayetteville to Alma, it’s studded with state parks, historic sites and trails. Or consider the Scenic 7 Byway, from Harrison to Jessieville. Visit arkansas.com and search “fall foliage.” Like MDC, Arkansas Parks & Tourism offers a leaf guide that’s updated weekly.


 

How our weather pattern in mid-Missouri could affect fall foliage

http://www.abc17news.com/weather/how-our-weather-pattern-in-mid-missouri-could-affect-the-fall-foliage/627654605

Brigit Mahoney KQFX (MO), Sep 28, 2017 04:41 PM CDT

Heading into fall, many look forward to the changing weather pattern, as well as the changing landscape. Beautiful, vibrant colors are an annual event as the leaves begin to change. However, many factors determine the look of fall foliage. Weather is one factor. In mid-Missouri, fall foliage typically is at its peak towards late October. The weather pattern we see leading up to this point can have a huge impact on how vibrant the colors are. Also, the weather pattern we see during the early fall season can impact foliage as well.

After spring, once the leaves are fully developed, trees start to store nutrients that helps the green leaves transition into fall colors. This is why sufficient rainfall during the summer months is crucial for optimal fall foliage.

This summer in mid-Missouri, we saw below average rainfall. For the months of June, July, and August, average rainfall in Columbia accumulates to 13.23″. Summer 2017 only brought in 11.21″, which is a little over 2″ below average. This isn’t a drastic drop in precipitation, but could be accounted for when considering fall foliage.

As we look closer to fall, the month of September has been dry as well. Average rainfall in Columbia for September sits at 3.92″, but this month has only brought in 1.92″ of rain. That’s a deficit of 1.57″. When considering all four months leading up to October, we fall nearly 4″ short of average. This could impact the typical orange, red, and purple colors we see during peak fall foliage, instead giving us duller brown and orange tones.

During the early fall, the weather continues to impact the foliage. Cool nights and sunny days help bring out the pigments in the leaves. For the next few days, mid-Missouri will have cool nights as lows drop into the 40s and 50s with sunny days. However, this pattern won’t last long.

The Climate Prediction Center’s Temperature Outlook indicates a warm up that’s in store for all of mid-Mo. It also predicts above average tempurates from October 3-9. By Monday, temperatures will be back into the mid 80s during the day, with lows only bottoming out in the 60s. This could have a negative impact on our fall foliage.

One last thing to note during the early fall season is rainfall. Surprisingly, it is better to have dry conditions as we head into the month October. This ensures that the leaves won’t fall prematurely before the colors develop. There is some good news here! The Climate Prediction Center’s Precipitation Outlook keeps most of mid-Missouri in below average rainfall from October 3-9. This could help those beautiful fall colors we all wish to see!

During peak foliage, it’s important that we see light winds and no frost to ensure a longer period with the beautiful, vibrant landscape!

Keep an eye out for the changing landscape here in mid-Missouri as we head towards late October. Send any photos to the ABC 17 Stormtrack Weather Team.

 

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