Tag Archives: Tree Felling Springfield MO

Dutch Elm Disease

What is the Cause of Dutch Elm Disease?

Dutch elm disease (DED) is caused by an aggressive fungus (Ophiostoma novo-ulmi) that kills elms regardless of their health. It is considered the most costly shade tree disease ever and will remain active in a community as long as there are susceptible trees. The fungus invades the water transporting vessels and produces toxins to which the tree reacts. In defense to the toxins, the tree produces gums and internal growths designed to block the advance of the fungus. The combination of the toxins and the defense mechanisms of the tree inhibit water flow to the crown, which causes wilting and tree death.

How Does Dutch Elm Disease Spread?

Female elm bark beetles lay their eggs beneath the bark of dead and dying elm trees. If the elm is infected with Dutch elm disease the newly hatched beetles will emerge from the tree carrying the deadly fungus on their bodies. The beetles fly to healthy trees and feed on its 2 – 4 year old branches, thereby spreading the disease.

Besides beetle transmission, Dutch elm disease may also be spread through grafted roots. When elms grow in proximity to each other, their roots can come into contact and graft together. This common root system provides the fungus with a pathway to spread through an entire stand of healthy elms very quickly.

What are the Symptoms of DED?

Dutch elm disease symptoms begin to develop 4 – 6 weeks after infection. The first noticeable symptom that results from the fungal occupation of the water-conducting vessels is wilting or “flagging” of one or more branches, usually starting at the branch tip. Leaves on infected branches turn dull green to yellow, curl, and become dry and brittle. As the infection spreads the wood beneath the bark displays brown discoloration.

What Can I do if My Tree is Already Infected?

Most infected elms cannot be saved. In rare cases, if the fungus has not moved into the root system, physically cutting out infected portions of the tree, with a process called tracing, can save the elm.

Sanitation is the most important tool for controlling Dutch elm disease on a community-wide basis. It involves the identification and removal of diseased elms. Such practices eliminate beetle breeding sites and reduce the number of disease-carrying beetles.

Root Grafts

Dutch elm disease can pass from infected trees into healthy trees through grafted roots. Macro-infusion of Arbotect does not prevent root graft infections. The only way to reliably prevent root graft transmission of the fungus is to physically sever the common root system.

How Can I Protect my Elm Tree?

The goal when protecting elms from the fungus is to evenly and completely distribute a fungicide chemical thorough the entire canopy of the tree.

  • To protect a tree from beetle-transmitted fungal infection, Arbotect fungicide must be evenly and completely distributed throughout the 2 – 4 year old branches.
  • The only way to get even distribution is by the tree injection method called macro-infusion. Macro-infusion injects a large volume of solution into the root flares of the tree. This solution is then transported throughout the canopy providing a protective fungicide barrier.
  • Arbortect fungicide does not protect elms from root graft infection. You need to physically server the root system from neighboring trees by trenching at least 36″ down.

Source: Rainbow Treecare Scientific Advancements, 2005.

Want to read more about tree diseases and pests? Click here to read our article on Emerald Ash Borer, an equally destructive scrouge to trees.  

All About Trees is caring for Springfield’s urban forest, one tree at a time. 

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When Do You Fire a Bad Customer?

We’ve all had experiences with a customer who, no matter what you do, you just can’t make happy. Maybe you didn’t prune enough, maybe you pruned too much. The price was too high, the grass got torn up or you made them go inside because they kept entering the drop zone under the trees. Regardless of the complaint, they claim their expectations of how the job would be done were not met.

Hire all about trees

Noel cutting a tree limb, which is part of the tree removal process.

The very first step is to look within the company first. Did the salesperson do a good job of communicating the right expectations? Were the specifications for the job written clearly, with concise details of the work to be performed? Did the crew do exactly what was on the work order? Were they careless in protecting the customer’s property? Were they polite and willing to listen to the client’s complaints, and make every reasonable attempt to make them happy?

In many cases, we discover that we didn’t do a good job of building the right expectations, and then we must engage in conflict-resolution strategies. It also leads to us writing more verbose specifications, especially if we anticipate that the client may be difficult.

Sometimes, after all these assessments have been looked at honestly, we discover that we are working for a person who is simply unreasonable. I have had numerous clients through the years who make it a practice to complain after every single job. I have had customers (often lawyers!) who refuse to pay for the beautiful deadwooding job we did, because they actually just wanted the tree topped. I have been burned to the ground in online reviews over trees that weren’t ever discussed or included on the work order.

In our company, we make every reasonable effort to resolve these issues. Our reputation is our second-most valuable asset – our employees, our first. We do have a limit, however, to how much we will let someone take advantage of our good spirit.

We keep a list of exceptionally difficult clients so that when or if they call back, we simply tell them we are politely bowing out, and they will need to find a new provider. If a client is mean or cussing at my office staff, they immediately get fired as a customer. While we don’t like losing the income from this type of client, we have always found a boost in morale when we announce to the staff that they will never have to endure them again.

Continuing to work for such unreasonable clients is certainly setting your team up for failure.

More at: https://tcimag.tcia.org/news-opinions/when-do-you-fire-a-bad-customer/

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Review Us

Please share your experience…review us on Google!

How to Review Us on Google

One of the greatest compliments you could offer us is to review us on Google. Not only is each review read and appreciated by our whole team, but it also helps us reach new customers! This allows us to take care of more of Springfield’s trees, which helps to make our community even better. If you have had a great experience with All About Trees, we would love to hear about it!  If you are willing to do so, it is quite easy! Please visit http://goo.gl/9trWh6

Testimonial by customer Bo Barks

Testimonial by customer Laurel Bryant

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Review Us on Google

Click here to view our Certified Arborists in Springfield MO!

Please call the office of All About Trees at (417)863-6214 to schedule an estimate.
Business hours are Monday-Friday 8:00 am – 4:00 pm. If you miss us, please leave us a detailed voicemail message with your name, address, phone number, email, and tree concerns. We will give you a call back as soon as possible. 

We are a full-service tree care company based in Springfield, MO. We offer many services, including tree pruning and trimming, tree removal, planting, stump grinding, cabling and bracing, shrub trimming, and consultation.  All About Trees is caring for Springfield’s urban forest, one tree at a time.

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Fun Facts About Trees

  • Dendrochronology is the dating and study of annual rings in trees.
  • General Sherman, a giant sequoia, is the largest tree (by volume) in the world, standing 275 feet (83.8m) tall with 52,000 cubic feet of wood (1,486.6m).
  • Leaves appear green because chlorophyll absorbs red and blue light energy, causing the green energy to bounce off the leaf’s surface.
  • Trees provide food and shelter for wildlife.
  • In one day, one large tree can lift up to 100 gallons of water out of the ground and discharge it into the air. Learn more tree facts.
  • Methuselah, an estimated 4,765-year-old ancient Bristlecone Pine, is one of the oldest living trees in the world.
  • Tree shaded surfaces can be 20–45°F (11–25°C) cooler than surfaces in direct sun, helping homeowners reduce summer cooling costs. Find out more about trees and the environment.
  • Consumers have a 12% higher willingness to pay for goods and services in retail areas that have streetscape greening such as street trees and sidewalk gardens. More on the benefits of urban greening.
  • Trees reduce stormwater runoff by capturing and storing rainfall in the canopy and releasing water into the atmosphere through evapotranspiration.

“Fun Facts About Trees.” TreesAreGood.org, International Society of Arboriculture, 2018, www.treesaregood.org/funfacts/funfacts.


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All About Trees Now Employs Two ISA Board Certified Master Arborists!

The ISA Board Certified Master Arborist credential is the highest level of certification offered by International Society of Arboriculture (ISA). This credential recognizes ISA Certified Arborists who have reached the pinnacle of their profession. In addition to passing an extensive scenario-based exam, candidates must abide by a Code of Ethics, which ensures the quality of work. Fewer than two percent of all ISA Certified Arborists® currently hold this certification, and All About Trees has two! We are very lucky to have two individuals with the Board Certified Master Arborist credential.

This is a remarkable achievement! To view more information on this certification and its requirements, please visit https://www.isa-arbor.com/Portals/0/Assets/PDF/Certification-Applications/cert-Application-BCMA.pdf


ALL ABOUT TREES TWO ISA BOARD CERTIFIED MASTER ARBORISTS!

Certified Arborist Noel in a tree
Noel Boyer
ISA Board Certified Master Arborist®
MW-3904B

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Certified Arborist Will in a tree
Will Branch
ISA Board Certified Master Arborist®
MW-4737B

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Our Certified Arborists

In addition to two Board Certified Master Arborists, All About Trees also has seven ISA Certified Arborists on staff. To view a list of our Certified Arborists, click here!


Contact Us:

If you would like to schedule an estimate, please call the office at 417-863-6214. Our office hours are Monday-Friday, 8:00 am – 4:00 pm. If you miss us, please leave us a detailed voicemail message with your name, address, phone number, email, and tree concerns.

We prefer a call, but if you are unable to do so, please use the contact form below.

    Name *

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    City, State, Zip Code *

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    Emerald Ash Borers

    Missouri Emerald Ash Borer (EAB)

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) is a serious threat to ash trees in Missouri. This invasive pest will eventually kill unprotected ash trees. Many trees can be saved with the careful use of systemic insecticides. However, not all ash trees should be treated, and for many locations the start of treatments should be delayed.


    1. What is emerald ash borer (EAB)?
    EAB is an exotic, invasive, wood-boring beetle that infests and
    kills ash trees in forests and urban areas.

    2. What does EAB look like?
    The adult beetle is dark metallic green with a bullet shaped body
    that is one-half inch long and one-eighth inch wide. EAB larvae
    (immature stage) are flat, creamy-white grubs with distinct bellshaped
    body segments. Adult beetles are usually seen from midMay
    through July on or near ash trees; larvae are found under the
    bark of ash trees during the remaining months of the year.

    3. Where did EAB come from?
    The native range of EAB is eastern Russia, northern China
    and Korea.

    4. How does EAB spread?
    EAB adults generally fly less than a half mile to mate and lay eggs
    on ash trees, making the natural spread of this pest relatively
    slow. Humans, however, can easily move EAB long distances in
    a short period of time. EAB can hitchhike under the bark of ash
    firewood, ash nursery stock, and ash logs and lumber, emerging
    from these materials to start an infestation in a new area.

    5. When was EAB first discovered in the USA? How did it get there?
    EAB was discovered infesting and killing ash trees in the Detroit,
    Michigan area in 2002, but researchers estimate it may have been
    in that area for ten years prior to the initial detection. EAB was
    likely introduced to the US in ash wood used for packing and crating
    goods imported from China.

    6. Where and when was EAB found in Missouri? How did it get here?
    EAB was detected in Missouri in July of 2008. It was found near
    Lake Wappapello at the US Army Corps of Engineers’ Greenville
    Recreation Area in Wayne County. EAB was likely introduced to
    Missouri by a camper bringing infested ash firewood from another
    state.

    7. Where is EAB now?
    Visit eab.missouri.edu to view a current map of Missouri
    counties.

    8. What is being done about EAB in Missouri?
    Several state and federal agencies are responding to the EAB
    threat. Field surveys are done annually to look for new EAB
    infestations. A statewide quarantine has been put in place
    to help slow the spread of EAB. The quarantine prohibits
    movement of hardwood firewood, ash trees, untreated ash
    material (chips, logs, etc.), and EAB itself from Missouri.
    Information about how to respond to EAB and the risks of
    firewood movement is being publicized to communities,
    industries and the general public. Cost-share funds are
    provided to communities to help them prepare for EAB’s arrival.
    Stingless wasps that parasitize and kill EAB eggs and larvae
    are being released at several locations to establish them as
    biological controls to help reduce EAB populations.

    9. How can I help slow the spread of EAB?
    Don’t move firewood! Inform your friends and neighbors of
    the risks of moving firewood. If EAB hasn’t been found in your
    county, keep an eye out for it on ash trees and report any
    possible sightings to officials. Once EAB is known to be in
    your county, consult the EAB Management Guide for Missouri
    Homeowners for advice on managing this destructive insect on
    your ash trees.

    10. Does EAB have any natural enemies?
    In North America, EAB is frequently eaten by woodpeckers.
    There are also a few species of tiny, stingless wasps that
    parasitize EAB eggs and larvae. These wasps have been
    released in a few locations where EAB has been detected
    to help reduce EAB populations. For more information on
    EAB biological control, visit agriculture.mo.gov/plants/pests/
    emeraldash.php.

    11. Where can I get more information?
    Visit eab.missouri.edu or call the EAB Hotline at 1-866-716-
    9974 for more information related to EAB in Missouri. Other
    websites with valuable information include
    emeraldashborer.info and dontmovefirewood.org.


    Works Cited:

    Extensiondata.missouri.edu. (2018). Emerald Ash Borer FAQ. [online] Available at: https://extensiondata.missouri.edu/Pub/docs/v00001/EABfaq.pdf?_ga=2.45824420.1413572983.1539713852-1962532674.1539713852 [Accessed 16 Oct. 2018].

    Extension2.missouri.edu. (2018). Tree Pests: Emerald Ash Borer. [online] Available at: https://extension2.missouri.edu/v1 [Accessed 16 Oct. 2018].


    Our Certified Arborists

    To view a list of our Certified Arborists, click here!

    Please call the office of All About Trees at (417) 863-6214 or fill out a contact request form to schedule an appointment for an estimate.

    Phone: (417) 863-6214
    Address: 3427 W. Farm Road 146, Springfield, MO 65807
    Email: [email protected]

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    Why Hire an Arborist?

    What is a Certified Arborist?

    Arborists specialize in the care of individual trees. They are knowledgeable about the needs of trees, and are trained and equipped to provide proper care. Hiring an arborist is a decision that should not be taken lightly. Proper tree care is an investment that can lead to substantial returns. Well cared-for trees are attractive and can add considerable value to your property. Poorly maintained trees can be a significant liability. Pruning or removing trees, especially large trees, can be dangerous work. Tree work should be done only by those trained and equipped to work safely in trees.

    Learn more about why you should hire an arborist.

    An arborist by definition is an individual who is trained in the art and science of planting, caring for, and maintaining individual trees. ISA arborist certification is a nongovernmental, voluntary process by which individuals can document their base of knowledge. Certified Arborists are individuals who have achieved a level of knowledge in the art and science of tree care through experience and by passing a comprehensive examination developed by some of the nation’s leading experts on tree care.

    Find an Arborist

    Services an Arborist can Provide

    • Pruning. An arborist can determine the type of pruning necessary to maintain or improve the health, appearance, and safety of trees.
    • Tree Removal. Although tree removal is a last resort, there are circumstances when it is necessary. An arborist can help decide whether a tree should be removed.
    • Emergency Tree Care. An arborist can assist in performing emergency tree care in a safe manner, while reducing further risk of damage to property.
    • Planting. Some arborists plant trees, and most can recommend species that are appropriate for a particular location.
    • Plant Health Care. Preventive maintenance helps keep trees in good health while reducing any insect, disease, or site problems.
    • Many other services. Consulting services, tree risk assessment, cabling and bracing trees, etc.

    Learn more about hiring a Certified Arborist.


    Our Certified Arborists

    To view a list of our Certified Arborists, click here!

    Please call the office of All About Trees at (417) 863-6214 or fill out a contact request form to schedule an appointment for an estimate.

    Phone: (417) 863-6214
    Address: 3427 W. Farm Road 146, Springfield, MO 65807
    Email: [email protected] or [email protected]


     

    Home. (n.d.). Retrieved October 5, 2018, from https://www.treesaregood.org/treeowner/whyhireanarborist

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    Benefits of Trees

    Benefits of Trees

    Have you ever imagined what the world would be like without trees? The benefits of trees extend beyond their beauty. Trees planted today will offer social, environmental, and economic benefits for years to come.

    Learn more about the benefits of trees.

    Social Benefits

    Social benefits of trees go beyond enjoying their beauty. Humans feel a calming effect from being near trees. The serenity we feel can significantly reduce stress, fatigue, and even decrease recovery time from surgery and illness.

    Communal Benefits

    With proper selection and maintenance, even trees can provide benefits to the community. Trees provide privacy, accentuate views, reduce noise and glare, and even enhance architecture. Natural elements and wildlife are brought to the urban environment which increases the quality of life for residents within the community. As well, fruit trees in public green spaces can have the added benefit of providing fresh fruit to the community.

    Environmental Benefits

    Trees alter the environment we live in by moderating climate, improving air quality, reducing stormwater runoff, and harboring wildlife.

    Examples of the environmental benefits of trees:

    • Trees help moderate temperatures by creating a cooling effect which can counteract the heating effect of pavement and buildings in an urban environment.
    • Compact tree foliage can serve as a windbreak, as well as provide protection from rainfall.
    • Leaves filter the air we breathe by removing dust and other particulates and releasing oxygen.
    • Trees provide shelter for small animals, such as squirrels and birds.

    Economic Benefits

    The economic benefits of trees are both direct and indirect. Property values of landscaped homes are 5 to 20 percent higher than those of non-landscaped homes based on the species, size, condition, and location of the trees included in the landscape. Trees also provide shade which can lower cooling costs for your home and reduce heating costs in the winter by acting as a windbreak.

    An arborist can help you determine the value of trees by providing an appraisal. Documentation on the value of trees in your landscape can assist with determining the property value, as well as, help with insurance claims in the event of a loss.

    Learn more about the value of trees

    Maximizing the Benefits of Trees

    Trees provide numerous benefits but in order to maximize a tree’s benefits routine maintenance is required. Though these benefits begin the moment a tree is planted, they are minimal compared to the benefits of a mature tree. The costs associated with removing a large tree and planting a young tree can outweigh the costs of regular tree maintenance practices such as tree inspection, pruning, and mulching.

    Learn more about mature tree care

     

    International Society of Arboriculture

    www.isa-arbor.com • p. +1 217.355.9411 • [email protected]

    ©International Society of Arboriculture 2009-2018
    Email comments and questions to ISA
    Thursday, January 11, 2018 11:42:30 AM (CST/ISA Headquarters Time)
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    Works Cited: 
    “Benefits of Trees.” Trees Are Good, International Society of Arboriculture, 11 Jan. 2018, 11:45, www.treesaregood.org/treeowner/benefitsoftrees.

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    Merry Christmas 2017 Trees - Springfield, Mo

    Merry Christmas from All About Trees – Springfield, MO

    All About Trees – Springfield, MO – We wanted to take a few moments to wish everyone a Merry Christmas. May you have a wonderful New Year full of family, friends and delicious food. The end of the year brings no greater joy than the opportunity to express to you season’s greetings and good wishes. May your holidays and New Year be filled with joy.

    Thank you and Merry Christmas!

     

     

     

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    The Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA) – Board of Directors

    The Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA) – Board of Directors

    There are almost 200,000 people working in the tree care industry in the United States. Hi, this is Noel from All About Trees. Like most other trades, we have our own industry associations. The Tree Care Industry Association has almost 2,500 member companies, and it helps tree care companies meet current standards for safety and quality. I’m proud to announce that I’m the newest member of the board of directors for the association. I am by far the smallest company represented on the board, but I was chosen because of All About Trees reputation nationally, for our quality and company culture. It’s an honor to serve on this board and a chance for me to help other small companies, nationwide, with their dreams of growing their business and keeping their employees safe and happy.

    All About Trees is a small business in Springfield Missouri, making waves on a national scale. If you need tree work, I hope you’ll give us a chance to show you how we are different. Look us up at www.allabouttrees.com.

    All About Trees is caring for Springfield Urban Forest one tree at a time.

     


     

     

    To view a list of our Certified Arborists, click here!

    Please call the office of All About Trees at (417) 863-6214 or fill out a contact request form to schedule an appointment for an estimate.

    Phone: (417) 863-6214
    Address: 3427 W. Farm Road 146, Springfield, MO 65807
    Email: [email protected] or [email protected]

    Share